explore. experience. expand.
Archive | Photography RSS feed for this section

Course Spotlight: Photographing Architecture in the City

 

Images by instructor Richard Langendorf

This spring, we will be offering a new course with instructor Richard Langendorf, Photographing Architecture in the City. A unique offering, this course would appeal to students interested in photography, architecture, art and art history, and urban planning and design. The diversity of backgrounds and experiences should make for an interesting array of creative projects.

Each student will work on a self-initiated project,  selecting a site for the focus of his or her work in the course. The place may be anywhere in the Los Angeles region – urban or suburban. It may be a work of architecture, an urban space, the urban edge, or the like.  This work will proceed in stages, examining the site from varying perspectives, including light, detail, documentary, and poetic interpretation, and ending as a portfolio of photographs that express the qualities of a particular place, sequenced as one or more stories.

Below you’ll see a list of class lecture topics, technical demonstrations, and creative assignments. To enroll, click here, or call (310) 825-9971.

Lectures on Architectural Photography
Early History, Wonders of World, American Topographic Views
Pictorialism, Modernist Views-Europe & US
Documentary: Progressive Era & Reform, Great Depression
Modern View: Experimental, Rise of Color Art Photography
Arch. Journals, Modern Arch. Photographers (Commercial), architecture without architects; architecture in color, landmarks & special events
Dusseldorf Academy, New Topographics, Learning from Las Vegas, Modernism reappraised
New Documentary: DATAR, etc.; architecture- from commercial to art photography
Post Modern: where architecture and photography merge
Man-altered landscapes, cityscapes of change
Constructed, Staged, and Invented Image
Final Project, no lecture or future of architectural photography

Select Demonstrations/Technique

Equipment selection
Checklist for planning and shooting
Shooting: lens selection, aperture-shutter-ISO trade-offs, etc.
Shooting: composition, parallax and parallax correction
Shooting: low light, twilight, night photography, TPE
Shooting: HDR and Pano, and post in ACR/Lightroom
Post: working non-destructively
Post: ACR-basic panel, curves, lens correction, and FX
Post: noise reduction, sharpening, mixed light conditions
Post: HDR and Panorama, Photoshop and other software
Post: enhancing/replacing sky

Assignments

Assignment 1: Site Proposal
Assignment 2: Getting Started, Research Paper
Assignment 3: Detail
Assignment 4: Time
Assignment 5: Light
Assignment 6: Context
Assignment 7: Poetics / Interpretation
Assignment 8: Documentary
Assignment 9, Post-Modern
Assignment 10, Outline, Final Project
Deadline to update Previous assignments
Assignment 11:Final Project
Assignment 12 Print Version, Final Project

 

Interview with Photography Student Joe Stehly

We always love hearing about the diverse backgrounds and experiences of our students. In this interview, recent photography certificate graduate Joe Stehly talks about what he learned in the program, and where he’s hoping to take his work in the future.

How did you get interested in photography, and why did you choose the UCLA Extension Photography Certificate?

I am an aerospace engineer by trade, but also took many art classes growing up.  I still really enjoy art and feel that it is very important to continue growing artistically. I have taken art classes focused other mediums since graduating college, but photography is the genre that speaks the loudest to me. My old roommate is a professional photographer and some of his black and white images sparked my interest.  He taught me some basics and I continued to learn on my own until I reached the point where I could not progress any further.  I needed professional instruction. Around this time I took a management class at UCLA Extension and saw a catalog for other class offerings during a break. While looking through the catalog the photography curriculum caught my eye. I decided to give Photography I a try and I really liked it so I enrolled in the certificate program.

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

I think the first thing to remember when starting the program is that everyone in the class with you is there for the same reason that you are: to become a better photographer. These classmates end up becoming close friends and people you can collaborate with on later projects.

Similarly, the instructors are focused on making you a better photographer. They have great real-world experience and teach you a lot about the business of photography and the creative process in addition to technical instruction.

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

Two classes that I took stood out as favorite of mine. The first was Lighting I with Kevin Merrill. I had never been in a studio before or attempted elaborate lighting setups. Both were intimidating to me prior to taking the course. However, after learning some basics I found that many creative avenues were opened to me by understanding how to use light. I found that many other classes, as well, pushed me out of my comfort zone and enabled me to round out my skill set. These new techniques that I was exposed to are not only interesting, but they allowed me to grow and expand creatively in ways that would not otherwise be possible.

The other class that really helped me grow was the Photographic Portfolio class. This was the final class that I took and I feel like it brought me full circle. The structure of the classes forces you to focus on one specific genre while creating a cohesive portfolio. I focused on Black and White Urban Landscape for the portfolio and was really able to fine-tune my skills. The instructor, David Daigle, is extremely detail oriented (every pixel matters) and this enabled me to better critique my own photos both compositionally and during post-processing. I learned an enormous amount in this class.

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

I plan to continue working on urban landscape photography while studying what the pioneers in the field, such as Julius Schulman, created.  The UCLA extension courses helped me find my voice artistically in this area and I will continue to refine that through various projects. I have also started setting up a home studio and am excited about the opportunities that it will enable.

What are you working on right now?

I have a few projects that I am currently working on. One is a continuation of a project that I did for my Documentary and Landscape Photography class where I look at the public/private school divide in Pasadena through photography. I am also working capturing more buildings throughout Los Angeles and soon I am going to Europe for a vacation in order to get some new subject matter.

ASMP Talk on Freelancing with Todd Bigelow

Instructor Todd Bigelow, who leads our Business of Photography workshop, will be giving a virtual interview with ASMP on being a freelance photographer.

ASMP Talk: Freelancing with Todd Bigelow – Tuesday, February 21st @ 11amPT/2pmET

Join ASMP Executive Director, Tom Kennedy, in a virtual interview with LA-based freelance photographer, Todd Bigelow, to discuss the many issues – building a portfolio, making client connections, licensing, protecting your works – facing freelance photographers in today’s fast-paced, tumultuous times. Following the one-on-one interview, Tom will open up the discussion with Todd to include a Q&A with webinar attendees. You can register here: https://www.asmp.org/webinars/strictly-business-webinar-february-21st-freelancing-todd-bigelow/. 

Los Angeles based freelance photographer Todd Bigelow has handled assignment work for more than twenty-five years for some of the world’s leading publications, non-profits and corporations including Sports Illustrated, National Geographic Traveler, Smithsonian, Time, ESPN.com, Newsweek, People, The NY Times Magazine, Costco, Target, The James Irvine Foundation and others. While at the LA Times he contributed to two team Pulitzer Prizes for coverage of the LA Riots and Northridge Earthquake. Portions of his long term project documenting immigration have been exhibited internationally and several images reside in the permanent collection at the California Museum of Photography and the Oakland Museum of California.  His workshop, The Business of Photography, is offered by leading universities, professional photography organizations and photography conferences around the country and has been named three times as a “fantastic” and “inspiring” workshop by Photoshelter.  Todd also teaches photography and photojournalism courses at California State University-Northridge and UCLA Extension.

Interview with Photography Graduate Christian Alarcon

Christian Alarcon just finished his photography certificate at UCLA Extension. Below he shares with us his academic and professional experience. To see Christian’s work check out his portfolio at christianalarcon.com .

Tell us about how you got interested in Photography, and why you chose the UCLA Extension Photography certificate.

I came to UCLA Extension a few months after High School in Spring 2011. I originally enrolled aiming for the Design Communication Arts ch2certificate. About mid way through the program, I decided to take Photography II as an elective. The day after I signed up, I went out and purchased my first camera, a Canon Rebel T3 equipped with an 18-55mm lens. I was HOOKED! That camera was in my hands everywhere I’d go. I didn’t even know how to properly use it, I would click the button and just hope I’d make a photo. Once the Photography II course began it was like I entered a new world. I would sit in class viewing slideshows of work and listen to my instructor Masood Kamandy and fellow classmates talk about exposure, shutter speeds, ISO’s and I had no idea what they meant. Clearly going straight into Photography II wasn’t the smartest decision, but it’s what motivated me to learn more about my camera and the art of Photography. I took a break from the DCA program and continued taking photos and learning as much as I could about photography on my own. As soon as I felt more comfortable operating my camera, I enrolled myself in the Photography Certificate program and that’s when my passion really began to grow.

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

img_7363_2Be very patient! Being patient with art is so important because then you’re achieving what you really want to achieve. Experiment with different styles and find what gives you that rush of emotion. Photography isn’t a competition. There will be times where you look at other peoples work and think to yourself “why don’t my photos look as good as theirs?” Don’t compare yourself to other photographers; instead look at their work as inspiration to help you get better. Put your passion into the craft and develop your own style. The most important thing is to always have fun and remember that you can never really fail if you’re doing something you love. The last crucial piece of advice I can give is learning how to save and back up all of your files. One day you will go deep into your archives and find some hidden gems that at the time you did not think were so great. And learn how to edit your work non-destructively. You will go through many different editing phases, and you will be very upset when you want to edit a certain old photo differently but you damaged the original copy.

 

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

I enjoyed all of my classes at Extension, but I’ll have to say Street Photography was definitely my favorite. From the moment I got my camera, Street Photography was an art that always fascinated me. Taught by the legendary John Weiss, this class really opened my eyes to the different elements of capturing great photos in the streets. Three of our class sessions were field trips, which consisted of us meeting at a certain location in the city and shooting together as a group. This gave us the opportunity to be out in the field while getting advice from our instructor, which I thought was really special. Weiss shaped me to become not only a better photographer, but also a professional. His passion and craft towards the art is truly something amazing and I can only hope to reach such a pinnacle one day. It was an honor being taught and guided by John Weiss, and for that I am very thankful.

christian-alarcon-08

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

There are so many things I wish to accomplish with Photography. My biggest dream of all is to travel. I would love to experience and capture the many different cultures of the world. Seeing the work of the greats like Steve McCurry, Alex Webb, and my former instructor John Weiss is what keeps that dream alive. I also hope to open my own studio here in Los Angeles, a creative work-space where I can offer my services and showcase my work. The possibilities with Photography are endless; as long I have a camera in my hands I’ll be happy.

 

What are you working on right now?img_5445

I am currently just taking my work day by day. I go out into the city with my camera every chance I get. Los Angeles is an amazing place to live and find inspiration. Everyday is a new story worth capturing. In today’s age people are so caught up in their daily routines and social medias that they don’t find the time to go out and experience the greatness their city has to offer; the people, the culture, the architecture, the food, and so much more. The work I continue to curate will eventually become a book where I can share all of these elements that make our city of Los Angeles such an iconic and historical place.

Interview with Photography Student Barbara Huber

After recently completing the Photography Certificate, student Barbara Huber invites us to look further into how her journey began. Below, Barbara shares her personal work and experience taking photography courses.

Tell us about how you got interested in photography, and why you chose the UCLA Extension Photography Certificate.

My interest in photography goes way back – my mother gave me the equivalent of a Brownie when I was about 8 years old and then introduced me the basics of photography.  With a hiatus of about 10 years, I’ve been taking and making(!) pictures ever since.  There came the point when “dabbling” P1250532wasn’t enough anymore and I felt a serious desire to line my passion with real technical knowledge. An acquaintance with serious photo-graphic tendencies introduced me to the UCLA Certificate Program. It provided me with the right teachers and affordable classes, but also with the scheduling flexibility I needed as a professional with a demanding day job that other programs didn’t offer. The rest is history! It was fun, it was demanding because I took it very seriously.

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

P1250534

Don’t fall into the equipment trap when you start out! It’s first and foremost the photographer who makes the picture. The process is the same for a cheaper model as it is for a super high end camera. Once you know what you want to and what you need to get there, it will be much easier to find the right camera that that fits that particular bill. As a beginner (and despite years of snapping away I would call myself that in the days before UCLA!) I didn’t even know what my needs were, and felt completely overwhelmed by so many choices. I see much clearer now.

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

Oh, where to start… I had fabulous teachers with a wealth of information on tap; it’s a hard decision to make. But if I really had to pick, there are two that stand out. History of Photography and the Portfolio Class. Both very demanding, but immensely rewarding.P1250722

Trying to replicate historic photographs and getting into the old masters minds was very challenging, but gave me a complete new understanding of the medium.

The Portfolio class really gives you yet another push when it comes to critical and especially self-critical evaluation. By then some of us had already found our voices (or at least were pretty close to finding it), and this class really gave us a last push over the edge to professionalism. I appreciated that particular guidance very much.

How have the UCLA Extension classes helped improve your work, and or expanded your professional development in the field?

For one, I work in the film industry and the technical knowledge I have gained has made an active participation in the world of post-production a) possible and b) really fun.

For two, it has helped explore and then focus on the underlying force that drives my creativity, which is a fascination with those hidden lines of non-verbal communication that form this invisible web all around us. It pretty much informs all of my photographic work now.

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

I’m working on setting up a collective of photographers and subsequently mount an exhibit of our work.

What are you working on right now?

For the moment I’m working on expanding a street photography portfolio I’ve started in class, and a separate project specifically involving street performers.

P1250593

P1250617

P1250682_MG_0527

 

 

 

 

 

Interview with photography student Donny DeBruno

Donny pic

Portrait by Arturo Gonzalez

We met Donny at our annual student show, where he had several beautiful pieces on display. Below, he talks about his experience in the Photography Certificate, and his goals for the future.

Tell us about how you got interested in photography, and why you chose the UCLA Extension Photography Certificate.

On an outdoor field trip in elementary school, I was handed a camcorder. The permanence and novelty of the recorded image captivated me and propelled me to a still camera.  Years later, after photographing a bird in flight next to the beach, I realized the pedestrian could be filled with anxious moments and the mundane often contained hidden potential that could be captured with a release of a shutter.  It was at this time that I began using a digital camera to interact with my environment instead of just observing it.

As I accumulated images, I sought a better way to evaluate and critique my work.  I discovered UCLA Extension which provided a path for technical and creative growth with the flexibility of online classes.  Although my fist classes were Photoshop 1 and Illustrator 1, with the intent of pursuing graphic and industrial design, I quickly gravitated to photography after signing up for the Portfolio Workshop class on whim.  It was this class that gave me structure to begin assembling photographs as a body of work and gave me the chance to present and have my photographs critiqued in front of a group.

DeBruno_Donny_Portraiture-5

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

Everyone’s path into photography varies, however, for me I was seeking a way to effectively express and communicate my work. It was through the UCLA Extension certificate program that I was able to find my voice and the confidence to clearly critique my own work.

Those new to photography should know when getting started its not critical to have the latest and greatest cameras and lenses. I quickly learned when presenting my work in class or in a professional setting, that my work would be selected over others due to the quality and strength of the photograph and not what equipment was used.

DeBruno_Donny_Portraiture-6

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why? 

Architectural Photography with Douglas Hill, Photography II with David Daigle and Lighting I and II with Kevin Merrill were some of my top classes, but History of Photography with Richard Langendorf was by far my favorite.  Don’t let the title of the class fool you, History of Photography was probably the hardest and most time-intensive class I have ever taken.  Throughout weekly assignments, Richard asks students to recreate famous photographs starting from the earliest known surviving photograph taken by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826 to modern works taken by the likes of Andreas Gursky and Jeff Wall.  Finally, Richard has students present their work via PowerPoint presentations that reflect the original work, your interpretation of it, including before and after images of your edits in Photoshop.

What separated this class from the rest was it forced me to think about a photograph that I was going to take before taking it, and how I was going to present it in class.  In the end, this class made me a better photographer and was well worth the effort I put into it.

DeBruno_Donny_Photo II-1

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

 I aspire to be a full time photographer displaying my work in galleries, and also creating books and wearable art such as clothing. As I near the end of the UCLA Extension program, I have begun seeking opportunities with my current employer that would make photography my main focus.

DeBruno_Donny_Photo II-4

What are you working on right now.

 My web site, www.donnydebruno.com.

An illustrated book based on a poem I wrote in the 6th grade that relates to a  photograph I took last year.

Currently redesigning the next generation of point of purchase Skateboard racks that should come out later this year for the Arbor Collective. www.arborcollective.com

DeBruno_Donny_Photo II-5

 

LA River Shoot for Photography II

We were thrilled to have Craig Havens back teaching with us for the spring quarter. His Photography II students got some valuable hands-on experience during three field trips to Downtown LA, the LA River, and Joshua Tree.

Though Craig’s now back in Berlin, he’ll be teaching Photographic Composition online during the summer quarter. Below are some images from their trip to the LA River (all photos by Craig Havens).

Havens 2 Havens 3 Havens 4 Havens 5 Havens 6 Havens 7

Interview with photography student Fosion Fernando

Fosion Portrait

Portrait by William Ortwin

We met with Fosion for a final portfolio review after he had finished his Photography Certificate. We loved hearing about his life and work, so asked if he would share some thoughts. Read more to hear his advice to new photographers, and his dream assignment!

Tell us about yourself and how you began your photography practice.

I grew up locally here living in Los Angeles. My ethnic background stemming from Peruvian parents gave me the opportunity to live in Lima, Peru a year after high school. It broadened my understanding of the culture and furthered my desire to learn more about different cultures. I had a passionate interest in sports and played for a few different soccer teams in my teens. My attention span grew shorter as I got older – my college years were short lived as I entered the corporate world at a young age. Fast forward a decade to the present with my recent certificate in photography from UCLA Extension. What propelled me to start a photography practice was the desire to do something I was completely passionate about and connect with people through the art of photography. The thought of combining something I enjoy doing and creating an income from it is a life goal for me. Photography appealed to me several years back as I really enjoyed capturing candid moments and the way an image can make you feel by composition and other factors. I’ve always enjoyed reminiscing over old images and getting a certain feeling come back to me as if time never passed.

Fosion_3

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

Photography is an art. It is there to create a reaction. Learn all the rules and technical aspects of shooting but at the end it will always be about what you are trying to express. Also, lighting is extremely important!

Fosion_2

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

I had really great classes and teachers. Very happy with several of those classes. If I had to choose a favorite it would be Portfolio with David Daigle. I enjoyed this class because it really challenged me to think about what I was trying to capture and why I was shooting it. It was about really observing the details of the images and seeing how the image was interpreted by others. A thick skin was good for this class and I enjoyed that!

Fosion_4

What would be your dream job in photography?

My dream job would be either entail traveling all over the world and capturing amazing work like Steven McCurry captures or getting the opportunity to enjoy the world of fashion as Mario Testino currently does through his work and campaigns.

What are you working on right now?

I am currently working on creating a Photo Blog that captures my recent works. As a freelancer it is also hard to express one type of work as your eye is on several things. My current interests are set on Food, Portraiture , Fashion and Stock photograph

To see more of Fosion’s work, visit www.FosionFernando.com.

Fosion_1

Business of Photography with Todd Bigelow

Business of Photo

 

We’re happy to offer The Business of Photography once again with instructor Todd Bigelow. Students who take it have commented that it’s one of the most important, information-packed experiences they have in the program. Todd has a wealth of real world experience and knowledge that he shares in the two-day workshop. His practical tips on contracts, copyright, client development, and much more make it useful for anyone considering taking their photography to a more professional level.

This workshop meets On Saturday, January 23 and Sunday, January 24 from 9:30am – 5pm. Enroll here, for more information click here.

Interview with Photography Student Elena Petrova

 

Elena Petrova

Photo by Kamil Mrouah

We met with Elena for a final portfolio review after she had finished her Photography Certificate. We loved hearing about her life and work, so asked if she would share some thoughts. Read more to hear her advice to new photographers, and her dream assignment!

Tell us about yourself and how you began your photography practice.

I was born in the historical and cultural city of Leningrad in USSR, now called Saint Petersburg in Russia, so I was surrounded by beauty and artistic inspiration since I was a child: ballet performances in Mariinsky Theater, lectures on Ancient China in Hermitage, photo exhibitions in galleries, theatrical plays, late night summer walks when the sky is still bright…I was always interested in the arts, especially painting, writing, and photography. I remember that I had a camera before that I took with me everywhere. Later I studied journalism in Saint Petersburg State University where not only we learned about writing, but also about how to take photos and develop our film in the dark room.

In 2009 I traveled to Los Angeles and later realized that I’d love to stay here and keep enjoying my life by the ocean and where everyday is full of sunshine. I thought about what could I do here, and photography came to my mind as I really love that art form and communicating with people through it. I found the UCLA Extension Program and it sounded really interesting. That’s how my professional photography practice began. I met many talented and inspiring people at UCLA Extension among my classmates and teachers. I started to study photography in 2013 and there are still many things I need to learn and practice. It’s great to do what you love.

Elena 4

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

Since I feel pretty new in this industry myself, I’d love to wish everyone and myself to be persistent and believe in yourself, be a better photographer than you were yesterday, keep improving your technique, get out of your comfort zone and explore things that you never thought you might like, smile more, be the light and then every door will be opened.

Know your camera and learn more about lighting. Educate yourself. Watch good movies, read good books, and look at classic paintings. Look at works of other photographers; the masters of back and white days and current notable photographers. That way, you will have a better taste and understand being a photographer.

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why.

I really enjoyed every class from Photography 1, taught by George Simian, to the amazing portraiture classes and mentorship taught by the incredible Michael Powers, to Portfolio Workshop with David Daigle and super informative event photography class with Jenna Schoenefeld. My favorite class was the mentorship class. Michael Powers is a very artistic and skilled photographer and in his studio in Pasadena he taught me many things about lighting, using strobes, vision, and shared interesting information on photography books and websites. I have to mention the Event Photography class too, which was the last class I took. It really gave me an understanding of event photography and beyond, and inspired me to start shooting events. I always liked the photojournalism style, and now I’m developing myself as an event photographer with a journalistic approach, focusing on candid moments.

Elena 5

 

What would be your dream job in photography?

I really like the amazing Russian actress and director, Renata Litvinova. She is very inspiring. I literally had a dream where she asked me “why you don’t take pictures of me?!” That probably would be my dream job. Also, I would love to meet photographer Paolo Roversi and work with him on a fashion assignment for the W Magazine.

Elena 6

What are you working on right now?

I’m currently working on my personal project, “Viva La Vita,” about seniors 85 years and older who are still full of life — they travel, work, have hobbies, very active, and enjoys themselves. I shoot it with my grandpa’s old medium format film camera, which gives a special feeling and energy to the images. Also, I just launched my event photography business called Happy Vibes Only (www.happyvibesonly.com), where I shoot small parties to big weddings.

Last year one of my portrait photos won an award in Popular Photography Magazine for “Best Shot” 2014. The photo will be published in a book called “Manual for Portrait Photographers” in January of 2016. Also, recently two of my photos were nominated in ‘Fashion’ and one in the ‘People’ category for the 10th Annual Black and White Spider Awards contest (2015) out of  “7,686 entries received from 74 countries.” The Nominees Issue will be released in January 2016.

Elena 1 Elena 2

 

Elena 3

windows-10-key windows-10-iso windows-10-product-key windows-10-activation-key windows-10-pro-key windows-10-education-key windows-10-enterprise-key windows-10-home-key windows-7-key-sale windows-10-key windows-7-key office-2016-key office-2013-key office-2010-key