explore. experience. expand.
Archive | Design RSS feed for this section

Distinguished Instructor Series: Unity with John Selig

On Tuesday August 11 at 12pm we will present the next talk in our Distinguished Instructor Series. Here’s an overview:

A lot of people assume that getting into game development, VR, digital art, or interactive design has to be super difficult; join us for a discussion on why that’s not the case! These fields are more important than ever, and UCLA offers a number of paths to find your spot in the digital arts—even if you never want to write a line of code. John will take you through a quick overview of the many ways you can get involved in these rapidly growing industries, and then he’ll demonstrate just how quick and easy it can be to build a scene in Unity!

John Selig

John Selig has taught students of all ages, from 6 to 65; everything from photography to programming to web design, and more. He’s got a passion for games of all kinds, and he specializes in getting new students excited about combining creativity with technology. In his free time, you can find him writing and performing rock music and working on indie games!

Enroll here for Tuesday’s free and informative talk on this exciting, emerging area of design!

Distinguished Instructor Series: Exercise Your Design Brain with Pash

On Tuesday July 28 at 12pm we will present the next talk in our Distinguished Instructor Series. Here’s an overview:

Exercise Your Design Brain

Has your creativity been sheltering in place for the last several months (or more)?  Well there’s no time like the present to pull it out of the garage, dust it off, and take it for a spin.  Join Pash as he takes you and thousands of other designers through a series of fun, interactive creative exercises designed to get those wheels turning and remind your brain what it means to think like a designer.  OK so there won’t be thousands of people–but there will be enough for you to strut your stuff and impress them…and hopefully yourself too along the way.  Make sure you bring a pad of paper and a favorite pen or pencil.  And your brain—even if it feels a bit rusty.

Pash is a design strategist, author, and educator with 30 years of experience in the field of design. He has designed the official logo for Miles Davis, brand extensions for Playboy, products for John Varvatos, retail product strategy for Motown Records, and advertising for Perrier.  For the last 10 years he has been focused in the entertainment industry.

Pash’s work has appeared in hundreds of magazines, journals, and books.  It has sat on shelves on six continents, it resides in the Smithsonian Institution, it hangs on a wall in Oprah’s office. It has taught children, revitalized brands, secured funding, clothed celebrities, trained executives, developed platforms, modernized legacies, and of course, sold products.

From 2002 to 2004 Pash served as President of the Los Angeles chapter of AIGA.  In addition to UCLA Extension (where he has taught since 2001) he frequently guest lectures at other art schools.  He is also a popular speaker and is (used to be) on the road a few times each year to speak to creative professionals around the country.

Pash’s book, Inspirability, was published in 2005 and features personal interviews with 40 of the world’s most prominent and interesting graphic designers.

Pash lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Jessica and his daughters, Mirabelle and Juliette.

Enroll here for Tuesday’s free and informative talk!



Course Series Spotlight: Unity I, II, and III

Curious what you’ll learn in our Unity course sequence? Instructor John Selig tells us more:

Why is Unity important for my design education?

Unity is, in many ways, the future; people think it’s only for games, but with Unity you can build apps, movies, augmented reality experiences, and even VR simulations. People are using it in the health industry, for interior design, and more; it’s an incredibly powerful tool, with room for every type of designer. You can get inspired by what’s possible here.

Why does it require a 3-course sequence?

You could say that what we’re learning to do in the Unity classes really combines every aspect of design; in these courses we learn to build rich interactive experiences, and with that comes the need for creativity, design sense, technical know-how, UX expertise, and so much more. Music? Check. Architecture? Check. Physics? Definitely check! Whatever you’re into, there’s a way to apply it to these projects, so although we cover a lot of ground in each class, it would be impossible to get through everything Unity has to offer in just one quarter!

How will this skill set translate to the “real world” workplace?

Interactive media and games is now the biggest entertainment industry today; bigger than movies, bigger than sports, bigger than music. Maybe that interests you, or maybe you’re just curious to see what it’s about; but either way, part of what you get in the Unity sequence is a strong foundation in programming, and every year this becomes more and more valuable, in every industry. Even if you think you have zero interest in being a programmer, knowing how to “talk the talk” so to speak can give you an edge in a great many careers today.

Can you share a sample assignment?
Sure! Here’s the final project from Unity I: 3D Game Design and Game Engines:

Final Project Unity I: GameJam!

What’s a game jam? Good question!
A game jam is an event where teams or individuals get together and each try to make a small game around a specific theme, within a specific time limit. And that’s exactly what we’re going to do!

Theme: Ghosts, Goblins, Monsters
You can make any kind of game you want, but it has to include ghosts and/or goblins and/or monsters in some meaningful way! If you’re looking for suggestions, see below!

Project Suggestions:
A game where you have to find and defeat ghosts in a scary forest
An app where you use the UI system to create an interactive ghost story
A game where you play as a goblin and try to drive away those pesky humans!
Literally just Pac-Man
A movie that plays out automatically, telling a story—if you go this route, make sure to use Cinemachine, animation, and potentially Unity’s Timeline system (see lecture 7 for more info)
Anything else that you can think of (as long as you can actually build it before the deadline!)

Thanks, John! Enroll in our Unity sequence today.

Join our free Distinguished Instructor lecture series this summer!

Join us over lunch for a series of live talks and presentations in the core academic areas of the Visual Arts. Each week we feature a distinguished instructor and dive into their area of expertise. Areas of focus for this series include Photography, Art History, User Experience (UX), Design, Studio Arts, and VR. Sessions begin at 12pm, last between 60-90 minutes, and are free and interactive. Bring your ideas and questions. Enroll for free today!

  • Tues., July 14   Craig Havens (Photography)
  • Tues., July 21   Dahn Hiuni (Art History)
  • Tues., July 28   Pash (DCA)
  • Tues., Aug. 4    Mayee Futterman (Studio)
  • Tues., Aug. 11  John Selig (Unity/VR)
  • Tues., Aug. 18  Diana Barraza (UX)
UCLA Extension Summer Cover by Matt at Varnish Studios

Design IV: Capstone final project – Code for America by Manoela Dowsley and Jason Acuna

Below is the Design IV: Capstone final project, Code for America, by Manoela Dowsley and Jason Acuna. The designers shared this about the project:

Code For America is a nonprofit organization that works with government agencies on tech solutions. The organization uses the principles and practices of the digital age to improve how government serves the American Public, and how the public improves government. They consider themselves to be a network of people making government work for the people, by the people, in the digital age.

Our rebrand project for Code For America focused on modernizing the visuals aspects of the organization and make those elements memorable. In addition, we worked to improve the communication and make the mission and vision as clear as possible to the public, including possible volunteers, government agencies, and most importantly, people in need of government services. We aimed to emphasize that this organization empowers communities by raising civic awareness through the use of technology. 

Our inspiration for this rebrand project was the organization’s mission to help people throughout the community through the use of technology and make government accessible to everyone. 

Our design process involved taking our favorite parts of the organization’s brand elements and making them stronger and contemporary.  

Thanks, Manoela and Jason. Excellent work!

Spring Quarter Getty Design Studio Placement

Work done by previous DCA intern, Naomi Hotta

Work done by previous appointee, Naomi Hotta

Applications due Monday, March 9.

THE WORK
The student will partner with a lead designer to develop graphic design solutions for various print ephemera connected with the Getty, including Education and Performing Arts. Work will involve collaborations with internal clients, production and web staff to coordinate deliverables. The Design Studio is a fast-paced, deadline-driven, creative environment that develops high quality design solutions.

THE SITUATION
The Design Studio at the Getty will offer a fully set-up MAC workstation for the successful student candidate. Work must be carried out at the Getty Center Design Studio.  The position is 12 hours per week, with preference for 2 six hour days (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday 8:30 – 3:30 with 1 hour lunch break).

PAG 39-40

Getty Center

QUALIFICATIONS
• Working knowledge of InDesign and other Adobe CC programs.
• Ability to generate a design solution quickly and carry it through to completion.
• Strong communication skills.
• DCA certificate candidate.

APPLY
Send your resume, cover letter and three work samples to dca@uclaextension.edu by Monday, March 9.

Need help with your cover letter? Kate can help: dca@uclaextension.edu

DCA Graduate Interview: Michael Kao

Michael Kao

Congratulations to DCA graduate, Michael, who was recently accepted to SVA NYC’s MFA Design program!

Tell us about how you got interested in design and what brought you to the DCA program.

Hi, my name is Michael. I was born in Ohio and raised in Taiwan. Since I was little, I was always drawn to images and loved to draw and color. Growing up, my parents took me to art classes, and I drew pictures for my friends. When I moved to Los Angeles for high school, I was introduced to oil painting and began visiting art museums. I decided to study graphic design in college because I wanted to combine my artistic talents with design skills. After I graduated college, I have been working in the design field for over five years. As a working professional, I wanted to continue to learn and improve my craft. UCLA Extension’s DCA program offers a wide variety of design classes with flexible schedules. It suited my needs perfectly and has helped me grow as a designer over time.

What were your favorite courses and why?

All the classes were great. My favorites were Advertising Design and Publication Design. In Advertising Design, we learned about different kinds of advertising campaigns and designed ads for brands and products we loved. Anya pushed us to develop ideas into designs that engage and persuade consumers on a deeper and emotional level.

In Publication Design, I created an environment and conservation magazine titled Sustain. I gathered interesting articles that I wanted to share with people. All the spreads were designed to be unique but with a cohesive look as a whole. Throughout the course, John’s feedback and class critiques really helped make our magazines better every week.

When and why did you decide to pursue an MFA?

Since I began working as a graphic designer, I always strived to be better and chase after my career goals. After many conversations with my family and close friends about personal growth and dreams, it was almost two years ago that I decided to start pursuing an MFA. While juggling work and DCA classes, I utilized most of my weekends to thoroughly rework and prepare my design portfolio. On top of real-world projects, the DCA program has better prepared me for MFA applications. I am glad all the hard work is paying off. I am also very grateful for all the support I received along the way.

What are your long-term goals for your design career?

My long-term goal for my design career is to become a creative director for a company and/or an organization that I believe in. I am passionate to work for a good cause and to make positive and meaningful impact in the world through design. I am excited for the next chapter of my design path!

Thank you, Michael!
UCLAx Visual Arts

windows-10-key windows-10-iso windows-10-product-key windows-10-activation-key windows-10-pro-key windows-10-education-key windows-10-enterprise-key windows-10-home-key windows-7-key-sale windows-10-key windows-7-key office-2016-key office-2013-key office-2010-key