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Summer Quarter Getty Design Studio Placement

Work done by previous DCA intern, Naomi Hotta

Work done by previous appointee, Naomi Hotta

Applications due Sunday, June 4th.

THE WORK
The student will partner with a lead designer to develop graphic design solutions for various print ephemera connected with the Getty, including Education and Performing Arts. Work will involve collaborations with internal clients, production and web staff to coordinate deliverables. The Design Studio is a fast-paced, deadline-driven, creative environment that develops high quality design solutions.

THE SITUATION
The Design Studio at the Getty will offer a fully set-up MAC workstation for the successful student candidate. Work must be carried out at the Getty Center Design Studio.  The position is 12 hours per week, with preference for 2 six hour days (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday 8:30 – 3:30 with 1 hour lunch break).

PAG 39-40

Getty Center

QUALIFICATIONS
• Working knowledge of InDesign and other Adobe CC programs.
• Ability to generate a design solution quickly and carry it through to completion.
• Strong communication skills.
• DCA certificate candidate.

APPLY
Send your resume, cover letter and three work samples to dca@uclaextension.edu by Sunday, June 4th.

Kate is on maternity leave, but another advisor would be happy to review your resume and/or sample work if you’d like to make an advising appt. before the deadline by calling 310-206-1422.

Welcome new DCA instructor Grace Magnus!

Grace Magnus

We’re thrilled to welcome Grace Magnus to our instructor flock, though Grace has been a member of the DCA community for years, first as a student, then as a teaching assistant, and now as an instructor. Her own design work is exciting and innovative, and we urge you to check out her portfolio at https://www.gracemagnus.com. Grace will be teaching Photoshop I in our new Woodland Hills center this spring.

What brought you to this field?
I like to joke that I’m a recovering English major, but in reality, I’ve had a wide assortment of jobs that have led me to where I am today. I managed an art gallery, edited copy, sold fine wine, applied makeup, and helped create brands. Along the way I’ve slung drinks, served coffee, worked graveyard shifts, installed roofing…it’s been a long hustle, and I’m proud of it. I succeeded in all these jobs by taking an ecumenical approach to learning–I relish the opportunity to receive new information, digest it, and clearly and concisely help others understand it regardless of the subject matter. It’s no wonder I fell in love with teaching soon after I fell in love with design.
In 2012, I took a Design Fundamentals class at Extension on a whim. I was new to Los Angeles, itching for change, and the public health class I wanted to take was suddenly canceled. Four years later I have an exciting freelance business I love. So many graphic designers fall into the field by accident or, like me, come into it later in life as a second, third, even fourth career. I love that. It means we have this pool of creative people who’ve worked hard and have a huge range of experiences to apply to finding design solutions.

Tell us about an especially rewarding project you’ve worked on and why you enjoyed it so much.
I’m a big proponent of Design for Good, and I always try to be working on at least one project that has personal meaning. For example, here’s a current project that hits close to home: I used to work very late hours while having two dogs that needed long walks at all hours of the day and night. I learned some time ago that the world can be a terrifying place for women after dark.
So I’ve been challenging my 2D design skills by pushing them into the 3D world, and I’m creating prototypes for personal safety devices, holsters, walking aids, etc. that will make it easier, safer, and more comfortable for women who need to be outside at night. The line is being printed on my 3D printer with the goal to distribute them for free. The entire line is designed with women’s tastes and bodies in mind, which makes it a real design challenge because women’s tastes and bodies are so varied.

Why is your course, Photoshop I, important for my design education?

Today’s emerging designers need to know how to use Photoshop effectively, efficiently, and creatively in order to stand out in an over-saturated market. Although Photoshop is considered by many to be Adobe’s most difficult and counter-intuitive program, it is also the most powerful and incredibly fun. My goal isn’t to drill into your brains every hot key (I wish, we only have 12 weeks!), rather it’s to guide you through the essential tools so that you the designer can find the exact right solutions for your own work. Your interviewer isn’t going to care that you know every single way to pull up the color picker, they care that your work has vision and originality, and that you can efficiently and effectively put to paper what’s in your head. I will guide you into harnessing Photoshop’s power so you can do just that.

Do you have a sample assignment?
Sure! I like to make sure that my assignments are challenging, but also fun and personal. So I’ll give you a little peek into one option for your final. Students will create a series of posters that utilize Photoshop techniques and best practices to morph different living creatures into one, then you’ll will use those images to make a poster series of PSA’s for a social or environmental cause. If you’re not into monsters, don’t worry, I’ve created project variations to suit every taste.

 

Thank you, Grace!

Spring Quarter Getty Design Studio Placement

Work done by previous DCA intern, Naomi Hotta

Work done by previous appointee, Naomi Hotta

Applications due Sunday, March 12th.

THE WORK
The student will partner with a lead designer to develop graphic design solutions for various print ephemera connected with the Getty, including Education and Performing Arts. Work will involve collaborations with internal clients, production and web staff to coordinate deliverables. The Design Studio is a fast-paced, deadline-driven, creative environment that develops high quality design solutions.

THE SITUATION
The Design Studio at the Getty will offer a fully set-up MAC workstation for the successful student candidate. Work must be carried out at the Getty Center Design Studio.  The position is 12 hours per week, with preference for 2 six hour days (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday 8:30 – 3:30 with 1 hour lunch break).

PAG 39-40

Getty Center

QUALIFICATIONS
• Working knowledge of InDesign and other Adobe CC programs.
• Ability to generate a design solution quickly and carry it through to completion.
• Strong communication skills.
• DCA certificate candidate.

APPLY
Send your resume, cover letter and three work samples to dca@uclaextension.edu by Sunday, March 12th.

Kate is on maternity leave, but another advisor would be happy to review your resume and/or sample work if you’d like to make an advising appt. before the deadline by calling 310-206-1422.

Design II final project presentation: Fiona Chen

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Fiona Chen shared her work with us:

Name: Foray

Fiona says:

This project was the most challenging, yet fulfilling projects I have done so far in the DCA certificate program! I chose to create an entire bakery/cafe based around a rustic, modern hip, homemade vibe that is quite popular right now. “Foray” was a name taken from the French word from forest, with an “American” twist to the name for readability.

I tried to appeal to a more hipster audience of late twenty and thirty year olds, as well as young, up and coming families in places like Atwater Village or South Pasadena. I was very much inspired by the look of cabins, forest (and trees of course), and a feeling of warmth and coziness.

I wanted the whole brand to convey this vibe by making it look a little loose, and handmade, and with the use of warm colors. The trend right now is a lot of artisan, modern, hip coffee shops, and I wanted to explore the trend with more of a craft and rustic perspective to it. The whole process was definitely long and hard, but it really was a good challenge in terms of seeing what worked and didn’t in terms of building boxes, and using new processes like screen printing. I had never made boxes before, and Henry really challenged us to think “outside the box,” literally. I felt really good about how my bakery box “kit” turned out, and with a little trial and error, I think it worked out well and was a different way of presenting packaged goods. I had a blast with this project and it definitely presented me with several new challenges, in a very good way. I hope that came through in the final result of my project!

Project 1 was a fragrance brand that was completely different from my second project. It leaned toward more of a minimal vibe towards an upscale audience. The result was “Opus” meaning composition. I used a diefold for the box (which required a lot of trial and error!) and a clear opacity adhesive for the bottle. My lookbook used different size cut pages to emphasize the shapes and lines I used as inspiration for this look.

 

Great work, Fiona!

Design II final project presentation: Drew Fransler

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Drew Fransler shared his work with us:

Name: Thirsty Spaniel Brewery & Public House

 

Drew says:

Thirsty Spaniel Brewery & Public House is exactly what it sounds like. The pub’s purpose is to drive business to its line of beers sold at liquor and grocery stores, which it does by offering beer flights and complimenting with a menu of updated classic pub fare. Its aim is to offer a great product and experience of authentic, high-quality food and beer served without pretension. Located in the Chicago suburbs, its clientele is a mix of married and single people of middle class backgrounds and better. It does a brisk happy hour, catering to commuters arriving at the nearby train station. On weekends, particularly over the lunch hour, it is a family- and dog-friendly neighborhood gathering spot.

The branding is designed to be simple, impactful and versatile to play well with a broad range of packaging designs and color palettes. The beers carry a primarily canine theme and the six pack cartons are designed for maximum shelf presence. Similarly, the cans and bottles are designed to have enough presence to be distinguishable at a tailgate party or backyard cookout. The two mortal enemies of fresh beer are air and sunlight, and cans are most effective against both. Smaller-batch special edition beers are bottled. The Dimension Triple IPA bottle is an anaglyphic 3-D image (contact me for a free pair of 3-D glasses).

The menu is designed to accommodate the entirety of offerings in one piece of collateral. Food on one side, beverages on the reverse. When attached to a clipboard, the beer menu is the serving mechanism for beer flights. The beer list is organized in a matrix from light to heavy and malty to hoppy, which allows for selection and shows how each beer relates to others. Tray liners and wraps are designed to reinforce the brand without competing with the presentation of the food.

 

Great work, Drew!

Design II final projects presentation: Caitlin Madill

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Caitlin Madill shared her work (two projects!) with us:

Name: Hex

Top 5 Descriptors: Edgy, Independent, Powerful, Commanding, and Wry

Target persona:
Age: 18-40
Gender: Female
Nationalities: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe,     and Asia
Income Range: $1,000-$5,000 per month
Average Income: $3,500 per month
Approximate/Relevant Costs: $150 per bottle of fragrance

Your inspiration for the project: I wanted to create something for young women that didn’t fit within the normal constructs of what society considers to be “feminine:” soft, flowery, pretty.  This fragrance is for the bold, unapologetic, edgy woman who embraces being dark and twisty.

Anything interesting that came up in the design/revision process: I had my heart set on using a St. Germain bottle for the fragrance because it was so beautiful and elegant, but I had some difficulty when it came to customizing it for the project.  In retrospect, I should have gone with a more simple bottle that would have lent itself more to applying branding elements.

Name: Sterling & Baxter

Top 5 Descriptors: Refined, High Quality, Graceful, Timeless, Classic

Target persona:
Age: 18-80
Gender: Male and Female
Nationalities: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe, and Asia
Income Range: $2,000-$3,500 per month
Average Income: $3,500 per month
Approximate/Relevant Costs: $15 per box of tea

Your inspiration for the project: I had the pleasure of enjoying high tea at Fortnum & Mason in Piccadilly Circus in April 2015.  It was a lovely experience and the quality and refinement of the atmosphere, tea, and food really stuck with me.  I wanted to create a brand of teas in the United States which evoked a similar feeling – one of quality, timelessness, and grace.  My aim was for the brand to be higher brow and fancier than Lipton and Twinnings (which are more generic and pedestrian) or Tazo and Teavanna (which are more down to earth and modern).
Anything interesting that came up in the design/revision process: I learned the hard way that silk screen printing really doesn’t work well on ceramic.  I attempted to brand a ceramic teapot, teacup, and saucer by using a custom silk screen that I created with the Sterling & Baxter logo, but unfortunately the slick nature of a ceramic surface and concave shape of the objects made it impossible to apply the logo without smudging or warping.

Great work, Caitlin!

A&D Museum to feature DCA student’s work this Saturday

Huge congrats to DCA student Aneesha Bharadwaj, whose work will be featured this Saturday Nov 5th, 6-8 pm, at the A&D Museum, as part of this pop-up exhibition:

In Type: LA
A Celebration of Place
Poster Launch Party

10 students | 10 faculty | 10 neighborhoods
1 studio | 3 days

The completed series will be showcased at a special one-day event held at the A+D Museum in the Arts District in downtown Los Angeles. Limited signed editions will be available at the event.

Click here to RSVP.

Great work, Aneesha!

In Type LA

 

Interview with Photography Student Barbara Huber

After recently completing the Photography Certificate, student Barbara Huber invites us to look further into how her journey began. Below, Barbara shares her personal work and experience taking photography courses.

Tell us about how you got interested in photography, and why you chose the UCLA Extension Photography Certificate.

My interest in photography goes way back – my mother gave me the equivalent of a Brownie when I was about 8 years old and then introduced me the basics of photography.  With a hiatus of about 10 years, I’ve been taking and making(!) pictures ever since.  There came the point when “dabbling” P1250532wasn’t enough anymore and I felt a serious desire to line my passion with real technical knowledge. An acquaintance with serious photo-graphic tendencies introduced me to the UCLA Certificate Program. It provided me with the right teachers and affordable classes, but also with the scheduling flexibility I needed as a professional with a demanding day job that other programs didn’t offer. The rest is history! It was fun, it was demanding because I took it very seriously.

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

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Don’t fall into the equipment trap when you start out! It’s first and foremost the photographer who makes the picture. The process is the same for a cheaper model as it is for a super high end camera. Once you know what you want to and what you need to get there, it will be much easier to find the right camera that that fits that particular bill. As a beginner (and despite years of snapping away I would call myself that in the days before UCLA!) I didn’t even know what my needs were, and felt completely overwhelmed by so many choices. I see much clearer now.

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

Oh, where to start… I had fabulous teachers with a wealth of information on tap; it’s a hard decision to make. But if I really had to pick, there are two that stand out. History of Photography and the Portfolio Class. Both very demanding, but immensely rewarding.P1250722

Trying to replicate historic photographs and getting into the old masters minds was very challenging, but gave me a complete new understanding of the medium.

The Portfolio class really gives you yet another push when it comes to critical and especially self-critical evaluation. By then some of us had already found our voices (or at least were pretty close to finding it), and this class really gave us a last push over the edge to professionalism. I appreciated that particular guidance very much.

How have the UCLA Extension classes helped improve your work, and or expanded your professional development in the field?

For one, I work in the film industry and the technical knowledge I have gained has made an active participation in the world of post-production a) possible and b) really fun.

For two, it has helped explore and then focus on the underlying force that drives my creativity, which is a fascination with those hidden lines of non-verbal communication that form this invisible web all around us. It pretty much informs all of my photographic work now.

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

I’m working on setting up a collective of photographers and subsequently mount an exhibit of our work.

What are you working on right now?

For the moment I’m working on expanding a street photography portfolio I’ve started in class, and a separate project specifically involving street performers.

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Interview with UX student Hope Ndlovu

 

UX designer Hope Ndlovu

UI/UX designer Hope Ndlovu

Originally hailing from Johannesburg, South Africa, Hope Ndlovu is a UI/UX designer based here in Los Angeles. Below, she talks about her experience taking UX classes in UCLA Extension’s Design Communication Arts program and shares some of her work.

Tell us about how you got interested in UX and why you chose UCLA Extension.Hope

I became interested in UX after working at a startup and learning about creating user-centred products. I had just completed my Bachelors Degree in Psychology and I was in search of a discipline that would allow me to use my knowledge and fascination with human behaviour in a technical but also creative way. User Experience was the perfect marriage of both of those things. I chose UCLA Extension because of the great reputation the program has and the calibre of graduates they produce. I was also impressed to know that each and every instructor there was a working designer with great accomplishments. To me, that was important. I wanted to be learn from people who knew what they were talking about and cared about what they were teaching.

FullSizeRender (4)For someone who is new to UX, what should they know about getting started?
1. Spend time on your portfolio. A good portfolio represents your process and being able to articulate this in your different projects is important.

2. UX has many facets. Figure out where you fit in under that umbrella and work at becoming great at it.

3. Last but certainly not least- NETWORK! The UX community in Los Angeles is small and tight-knit. Going to different events will help you  meet people, keep up with new trends in the field, and hopefully land some awesome gigs.

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?FullSizeRender

There were SO many! If I had to choose just one, it would have to be UX: Mobile First. I was taught by Julia Morton. Again, I loved the passion she had for what she was teaching but also how knowledgeable I found every class to be. I learnt things I thought I already knew!

FullSizeRender (2)What would be your dream job?

My dream job would be to work at an agency that values good UX, within a collaborative design team.

I know that there are things I don’t know, so I’m constantly seeking opportunities to learn and share ideas and ways of thinking. My philosophy is, if you find yourself not “Googling” anything anymore at your job, it’s time to move on.

 

Congratulations, Hope!

Interview with recent DCA grad Rodrigo Trabbold

It’s always a joy to spotlight recent DCA graduates who’ve grown immensely as designers through the course of the program. Rodrigo Trabbold answered our “big 5” questions and shared some of his work with us:

What brought you to the DCA program?Social media infographic flyer

I decided to be a part of the Extension program at UCLA because I was looking for a way into the entertainment design industry, which is very strong here in LA, and because I wanted to build a stronger portfolio, with more pieces related to entertainment design.

What were your favorite courses and why?

BenHoward_final_FINAL_713I loved all of the DCA program. My favorite courses were Entertainment Design, Design Fundamentals, Branding: Icons and Logos, and Publication Design.

As a designer, what does a potential project need to have for you to feel passionate about it?

In order for me to feel passionate about a project, the project needs to be creative and have a very strong concept and idea. A good project always leaves you thinking about it, or gives you a different perspective over a certain subject. In other words, in a way, it changes you.

If the phone rang right now and somebody offered you your dream design job, who are they, where do they work, and what’s the job?_Cover_1000

My dream job would be to work as a designer for Ignition or Art Machine, some of the biggest entertainment design agencies here in LA. I want to be part of this world, to create the key art for movies and video games, their Title Treatments, and posters.

Where do you see yourself professionally in 5 years?

Five years from now I would love to be a creative director of a good design studio or advertising agency.

trabbold

 

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