explore. experience. expand.
Archive | Design RSS feed for this section

Course Spotlight: Your Idea as Innovative Solution

If, like me, you hear “strategic thinking” a lot, but you’re not quite sure how to show you’re good at it, the upcoming class Your Idea as Innovative Solution may be for you.

Instructor Scott Hindell is a favorite of many, and can guide you in your approach to some of design’s most difficult problems. Here is what other students have had to say about him in this course:

Very helpful in designing and presenting innovation from different points of view.

Very passionate and knowledgeable. He is a great teacher.

Scott tackled our now-famous “course spotlight” questions:

Why is this course important for my design education?

We are hearing a lot about innovation these days, but most of it sounds like a race for bigger, better, faster, cheaper. A walk down the aisle at WalMart shows us what that gets us. Incremental improvements aren’t what businesses need. They are looking for quantum leaps in value, and research is telling us designers are the best people to lead us where we need to go. Designers are turned on by new ideas, the unknown, the unconventional. They like to produce the unexpected. Unfortunately, designers aren’t always the best equipped to deal easily with their ideas.

What will I take away from this course?

The real opportunity is to combine your design talent with the art of persuasion. It’s not as difficult as one might assume. Most think you must become an advocate for your idea, which means committing to a tireless defense of that idea. Surprisingly, it’s not that difficult, it just requires a little bit of strategic thinking.

Do you have a sample exercise/assignment?

Yes! Exercise – Students are directed to choose one of the three following research methods to observe Starbucks users:

Choice #1 (Narration) – Ask one user to describe aloud what they are thinking during a complete visit to Starbucks. Then submit a description of the most notable observations.
Choice #2 (Still-Photo Survey) – Capture a series of pictures of specific objects, activities, etc. during a complete visit to Starbucks. Then submit these with descriptive titles and/or captions.
Choice #3 (Surveys & Questionnaires) – Ask at least 3 Starbucks users a series of targeted questions in order to ascertain particular characteristics and perceptions of users. Then submit a summary of the most notable findings.

The primary goal of the exercise is to help students develop good observation skills, and most importantly, empathy for people’s differences.

When this course was offered last, I sat in the night this assignment was reviewed. It was way more illuminating than you may expect! The photo documentation and presentation was also engaging. It led to a great conversation about branding and personas.

This course credits as an elective in the Global Sustainability Certificate, as well as the DCA Certificates. If you want to see the syllabus or ask Scott a few questions, just let us know.

And register anytime by following this link.

 

Course Spotlight: Advanced Package Design: Concept to Completion

Award-winning instructor Shirin Raban tells us more:

Why is this course important for my design education?

In this age of digital realm and computers, hand skills can make a huge difference in quality of design. Package design, can be quite complicated in the variety of tasks and skills it requires. Developing an understanding of this process, can be quite helpful in your design thinking and strategy creation in a variety of design fields.

What will I take away from this course?

The goal of this class is to develop an in-depth understanding of the many components involved in package design, and to have a hands on experience in developing an innovative package solution from concept to completion. Your final mocked up package will be created through both team and individual efforts. This is an excellent opportunity to create not only an excellent portfolio piece, but also a case study to showcase your complete process.

Do you have a sample exercise/assignment?

We will make a trip to Whole Foods to find a package that your group thinks can be redesigned to address an environmentally or socially conscious issue related to it. You will work together to define strategies and then, you will each develop your own package including the computer design, aesthetic style and final mockup.

Enroll today!

Course Spotlight: Designing for Humans: Culture and AnthroDesign (Online)

Looking to get a jump on an elective for our upcoming User Experience Design certificate? This quarter, enroll in Designing for Humans: Culture and AnthroDesign (Online). Instructor Zelda Harrison was kind enough to tell us more:

Why is this course important for my design education?

Most of us understand the immediate benefit of living and working in a global economy. A significant number of us will collaborate with colleagues and clients in another country, and even locally, we will be called upon to develop products and communication for people who either speak a different language and/or live very differently from us.

The good news is that technology has provided us with the tools to communicate and work effectively across time zones and geographical locations. The trick is in managing the “soft skills” by developing a toolkit that takes into account the audience’s culture and values. It should be noted that when we speak of “culture,” we are talking about generational and lifestyle differences too, not just ethnic differences.

Anthrodesign is not “politically-correct” design or “designing to appeal to everyone.” The Anthrodesigner is like a detective, using anthropological observation techniques to develop an awareness of the end user, and inform herself about appropriate design choices.

When people ask you what you do, how do you explain it?

I work primarily as a designer in visual communications. I also explain that I specialise in anthrodesign, which means I have developed tools that allow me to discern the audience’s values and priorities, and therefore communicate more effectively with them.

What will I take away from this course?

In addition to honing your skills as a designer, you will have a better grasp of the research methods and how to apply them. Many designers are pretty happy with applying their skills, coming up with concepts and then perfecting the visual product.

But there are important industry changes for the designer : in a service-based economy, the “communication” and “functional” aspect of our work is informing more and more the “visual” aspect, so our primary vocation is engaging people by appealing to their values and environment, not just their taste. To do this effectively, you must “walk in the user’s shoes.”

In addition to this, many designers are now working “in-house” which means they are obliged to work on multi-disciplinary teams with non-designers. It also means that designers must understand the business and marketing aspects of the projects, ie., the audience’s needs, and participate in defining the message and product to the audience.

In my opinion, this role enhances the value of design, but it also means increased commitment and responsibility from the designer, beyond concept and design execution.

What are companies looking for when they hire an “AnthroDesigner” both in terms of skills and portfolio?

There are very few hiring companies who will reject a designer with a portfolio that demonstrates an acute understanding of the target audience and with the research and working papers to back it up. Naturally, the design and messaging need to be consistent with findings and definition of the target audience. This is something we will explore thoroughly in the class.

In the “real world,” selling/being paid the time to conduct research or dissect the target audience is very difficult, especially to small and medium sized businesses. The purpose of this class to give participants the space and time to develop analytical tools that will make them efficient and persuasive. I believe these tools will carry them for the rest of their careers.

What could be a challenge for students this class?

I can’t argue enough in support of the time honoured matra that “form follows function.” A colleague of mine, Mr. Peji, takes it a step further by asserting “form follows culture.” Students will be encouraged to use their skills and talent to define a creative brief and concepts based not on their own experiences, but on the audience’s.

Students who are unable to “walk in the shoes of the user” will find this challenge, hopefully one worth taking on.

Do you have a sample exercise/assignment?

Yes, my group, the Center for CrossCultural Design, has been compiling examples of great design inspired by anthropological investigation and crosscultural awareness.

We organised a competition to explore the application of design and culture and gave the first prize to Beth Shirrell from Kentucky. Here’s what she had to say about her work :

“Kalakari translates from Hindi to English to mean ornamentation. I explored typographic expression by creating a display font that captures and reflects the ornate culture of India. Specifically taking impetus from the countries architecture, the ancient art of henna painting, and Hindu iconography. The font is a collection of 26 majuscule forms that make up the English alphabet. The collection is entitled Kalakari Display.”

Design Researchers can be the designer’s closest collaborator and partner. For those interested in understanding the landscape of design research, check out this article by Uday Dandavate of SonicRim.

You are also welcome to explore the Center’s activity on our blog and facebook. You’ll find a smagasbord of topics ranging from geopolitics and economics to design and culture. I believe this reflects a reality of most skilled anthrodesingers : polymath approach to audiences is critical.

Course Spotlights: Web Design I, II and III

 

What will you learn in our web design sequence? Master instructor Mitch Gohman broke it down for us:

Web Design I: HTML & CSS
This class no longer focuses on Dreamweaver – in fact it allows students to use any software they wish to generate the code that builds websites. A great deal of the industry has moved away from Dreamweaver professionally, and it allows us to focus more on real-world web production techniques.

The backbone of this class is the relationship between HTML5 and CSS3. Students gain an intermediate understanding of this relationship to produce more compelling and modern web designs.

• S1: An Introduction to Web Design
• S2: CSS Selector Types
• S3: Relationships
• S4: Web Imagery
• S5: The CSS Cascade
• S6: Floats and Positioning
• S7: Project Review and Layout Conversion
• S8: CSS Navigations and Web Build
• S9: Advanced CSS Navigations
• S10: CSS3
• S11: Project Review and Workshop
• S12: Completion and Workshop

Web Design 2: JavaScript and jQuery
This class is about understanding user interactivity and making things move. Engaged experiences. We look at rollovers, swap images, slideshows, tabs, light boxes, banner ads without gifs or flash, parallax, AJAX.

• S1: JQuery Basics
• S2: Events and Animations
• S3: Swaps and Rollovers
• S4: Tabs and Banner Ads
• S5: Project Review
• S6: Degrading Gracefully
• S7: Parallax
• S8: Project Review
• S9: AJAX
• S10: Form Processing
• S11: Project Review and Workshop
• S12: Completion (Optional Attendance)

Web Design 3: Real World Application
Taking everything you learned from Web design 1 and 2, this course gives you the opportunity to tackle real world projects. You can look at the first 2 classes as training wheels, in this class the wheels come off and you are challenged to develop your skills through application. Imagine being guided through intermediate concepts, but also challenged to think beyond those concepts by applying what you have learned to your own creative solutions.

• S1: Course Overview and Refresher
• S2: Magazine Translation
• S3: Analysis and Class Development
• S4: eNewsletter
• S5: Analysis and Class Development
• S6: Drop Down Menus
• S7: Analysis and Class Development
• S8: Contact Us Email (with server-side and client-side form validation)
• S9: Analysis and Class Development
• S10: Parallax
• S11: Analysis and Class Development
• S12: Final

A Wide World of End Users

My brother lives in Singapore, where Chinese New Year is the biggest celebration of the year. He shared this Pizza Hut ad with me, which in turn made me think of our spring quarter course, Designing for Humans: Culture and AnthroDesign and the rich array of end users a designer can potentially reach.

Check back soon for a more detailed post on this upcoming course.

 

Course Spotlight: Package Design

One of our most popular electives is Package Design, where students bring all they’ve learned in the core courses to create innovative, problem-solving designs that strengthen their portfolios.

Instructor John Beach gave us some more insight into the course.

Why is this course important for my design education?

Package Design is a crucial element in the completion of your design education. It’s one of the final steps in understanding what branding is and how it directly effects the consumers process in making a choice of what products to buy, own, eat, or use. It acts as one of the final ways a producer of products can market their product to consumers.

As designers, it’s important that we help keep the client focused on what elements will ultimately make the product memorable, and under the best of circumstances, coming back for more! This course also further explores how typography, color and image can alter and persuade the consumer decision-making process.

What will I take away from this course?

This course gives a fantastic introduction to the power of strong packaging and branding by taking a look at a multitude of tasks developed to help you gain insight into what makes a great package. We start with an entertainment package. Obviously, this is a huge market in Los Angeles (specifically) and the design field in general. We will explore how to conceptually develop an idea into a container that promotes both the producers vision of their product, but more importantly, a package that the consumer will find intriguing enough to purchase, take home and use. We will explore the various methods used to design packaging. We will digitally render the first assignment.

The second assignment will be a hand building experience. Working with different substrates and templates we will explore the relationship between packaging and the presentation of food products and the challenges a specialty food product presents.

For the third exercise, we take a look at line extensions and what happens when you have multiple elements to package together. We combine vessels such as glass and plastic with paper, wood or cardboard, or if you choose, you can explore what happens in the sporting goods world when you have a product line with different sized items, and what is the best way to solve those issues.

The beauty of this class is that it gives you the opportunity to tailor your experience with directions in packaging you are most interested in. We will of course look at how packaging is changing in today’s post consumer waste world and how different elements can be altered or explored to make your solutions have smaller footprints within global consumer waste issues.

The spring quarter section of Package Design begins April 5th.

Course Spotlight: Icons, Logos, and Logotype Design

In Icons, Logos, and Logotype  Design, students learn to develop comprehensive and memorable identities using symbols, logos, and trademarks while considering message reducibility, media variables, and usage standards.

Outstanding instructor award-winner Shirin Raban answered a few questions about the course for us.

  • Why is this course important for my design education?
    Brand identity design is a very powerful way to clarify design objectives, organize information and communicate it visually and effectively. A logo is not merely a pretty design; it is a conceptual way to present the image of a person, company or product to the world. You can apply your knowledge to other design disciplines and your view point in general. 
  • What will I take away from this course?
    On top of a number of portfolio pieces, you will learn to ask questions that define important objectives, and will develop the skills to visually communicate those objectives in a clear and concise way. Along the way, you will combine those skills with artistic sensitivity and creative thinking to design fun and useful logos and apply them to a number of formats such as promotional pieces, retail environments and identity systems. 
  • Do you have a sample exercise/assignment?
    A.   Designing a logo mark and applying it to three branding items.
    B.   Designing a logotype for a retail store and applying it as outdoor or indoor signage.
    C.   Designing a personal logo mark based on the book “Decoding Design” to make use of numbers and their universal meanings. Followed by designing a print or electronic promo piece (brochure, web page, etc.) and applying the logo mark to it.
  • What have other students produced for their portfolio in this course?
    Here’s an example of a signage application by student Tamara Lau:

And here is sample work from student Imelda Halim:

And from student Heather Malone:

There’s still room in the online section of Icons, Logos, and Logotype  Design, this winter. Click here to enroll today.

Adobe Illustrator User’s Group: Workflow with Adobe Ideas

January 18, 2012 06:45 – 08:30 PM
MacMall Retail Store
1505 Wilshire Boulevard
Santa Monica, CA 90403
310-394-7779

Chevon Hicks will present workflow for Adobe Ideas and Adobe Illustrator.

Chevon has spent over 20 years in both the traditional and digital agency worlds, combining art and technology to bring digitally driven experiences to life. His career began in high school as an art department intern at ad agency Kresser/Craig, just as the agency world began to shift from creating ads by hand to doing everything on computers. This experience proved unique in that Chevon was steeped in the values of traditional design and advertising, an increasingly lost art these days, before being thrust headfirst into digital.

As a teenager he was old enough to master the old practices and young enough absorb the new technology that was rapidly taking over the industry. An eventual Fine Arts major at Otis/Parsons, Chevon applied his knowledge of technology to his artwork. Technology manifested itself as part of the creative process of traditional media and sometimes the execution of the work itself in the form of installations, paintings, sculptures and CD-ROM experiences. He felt that it was important to major in Fine Arts, not Advertising or Design, in order to give himself the broadest possible perspective on visual communication. Besides, he was learning advertising the real way — on the job, while putting himself through school.

In art school, Chevon became most well known for city-wide poster campaigns where the artist promoted himself. These “campaigns” expressed themselves as wheat pasted posters, uninvited lecture series and impromptu autograph sessions. The experiment was Warholian — the idea that putting something on a pedestal makes it great, ala the way Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans were able to transcend the banal by being immortalized on canvas and viewed in a gallery setting. People would show up to Chevon’s lectures and autograph signings simply because it was “advertised”. These were the methods used to promote his work — the secret being that the campaign was the work itself. It was clear that he found it hard to escape his advertising industry influence, even within the incubator of a world-class fine arts program.

Chevon founded Heavenspot in 1997, two years out of college and has been creating amazing interactive ever since. Chevon’s expertise in interactive design has been recognized by The Webby’s, Communication Arts, HOW Magazine, The Hollywood Reporter, The FWA, Variety and BusinessWeek.

In addition to his duties at Heavenspot, Chevon teaches an undergraduate course at the USC School of Cinematic Arts entitled, “Interface Design for Games” in the Robert Zemeckis Center. His other passion is soccer, the beautiful game, which led him to the creation of a thriving adult’s league complete with corporate sponsorship.

Chevon lives in the Silverlake district of Los Angeles with his wife Stephanie and their son Ziggy.

Click here for more information. 

The event is free! Please RSVP on the Adobe Illustrator User’s Group Facebook page.

Parking is free in the lot behind the store!

Internship at Green Graphics

Green Graphics and Printing is a graphic and website design studio as well as an eco-friendly print shop. We have a casual and fun work environment in a pleasant atmosphere. The owner is a UCLA Extension DCA grad!

We are seeking a full or part time Graphic Design intern in our Woodland Hills office to gain hands on experience working with an extremely wide variety of projects. We work with both small and large companies and design everything from logos, stationery, postcards, and brochures, to product packing, books, custom die cut collateral and websites and many other different types of projects.

Please note, this is an unpaid internship, (although we usually give our interns a monetary gift at the end 🙂

Qualifications:

– Knowledge of Photoshop and Illustrator. Knowledge of InDesign a plus.
– Ability to work in a fast paced environment and to take direction
– Creativity!
– Must love dogs. We bring ours to work, and you can too if they get along with our big pooches!
– We are looking for someone who can work 2-3 days/ week 6-8 hours a day.

What you will do and learn:

• How to properly set up artwork for print and web
• Work start to finish on projects, and you will be allowed the use of some projects that you create to use in your portfolio.
• We never have the same job twice, so you will always have something new to work on!

What we will never ask you to do:
• You will never be made to run errands, get coffee, file papers, or do office work.

We are here to help give you real world experience and teach you tips and tricks you may not have learned in school. We will gladly help answer any questions, and you can even use our laser printer to make nice prints for your portfolio and other class projects, free of charge.

Please email us a resume and/or portfolio to info@gotgreenprinting.com .

windows-10-key windows-10-iso windows-10-product-key windows-10-activation-key windows-10-pro-key windows-10-education-key windows-10-enterprise-key windows-10-home-key windows-7-key-sale windows-10-key windows-7-key office-2016-key office-2013-key office-2010-key