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Course Spotlight: Game-Based Learning

It’s always exciting to offer new elective courses, especially in the burgeoning field of game design and learning. This summer, we’re offering the new 2-unit online course Game-Based Learning. Instructor Randall Fujimoto tell us more about it:

Why is this course important for my design education?

This course is important for design students because of two main reasons: 1) To become familiar with game design in relation to learning, and 2) To understand the design implications of designing for the gameful mindset generation.

Game Design
With approximately 2.2 billion active gamers worldwide, games are fast becoming the most important media of our time. Therefore, any good design education needs to include the study of game design. Game designers are typically interested in designing all aspects of a game, including gameplay, art and animation, environment design, sound and music, and user interfaces, in order to make games engaging and fun. In this course, we look at the design of games not only as it relates to engagement but also, and more importantly for educators, how it relates to learning.

Gameful Mindset
In the U.S., the average 21-year-old person has played an estimated 10,000 hours of video games. The sheer amount of gameplay hours has undoubtedly had an effect on the way that today’s “gamer generation” thinks and learns. They have developed what we call a “gameful mindset,” which describes the unique ways in which gamers think, learn, and live their lives. Anyone who is designing anything for the gamer generation needs to understand how a gameful mindset affects the way these people learn how to use what they are designing. This course can help future designers become familiar with the characteristics of a gameful mindset and how they relate to learning.

Do you have a sample assignment we’ll be working on?

One assignment will have teams working on designing a lesson plan or learning activity centered around using an existing video game to help students learn. In order to design such a lesson plan or learning activity, teams will have to identify one or more learning outcomes and objectives, conduct research on existing video games that can be used for these outcomes and objectives, and then create a design plan that details the entire learning process. Teams will share their completed design plans with the entire class to get feedback and improvement ideas.

What will I take away from this course?

This course will give you a solid knowledge base about the various aspects of game-based learning and how to design various learning activities that utilize games and game-like thinking. The course will cover video games, educational games, game design projects, gamification of courses, and other topics related to game-based learning, including the intrinsic motivations inherent in game-based learning activities.

Thank you, Randall!

Enroll in Game-Based Learning today.

Design IV Student Project Spotlight: Aviva Family and Children’s Services

We’re highlight three of the outstanding group projects created by students of John Beach’s fall Design IV: Advanced Design Practice course.

Next up: Aviva Family and Children’s Services by Jonas Lin, Yuling Liang, Flora Zhuang.

First John gives us an overview of the course:

Students get the opportunity to choose a real life non-profit organization to rebrand, refresh and reorganize the public’s perception of its value. We start with branding, and through web presence, social media and virtually any other method such as (but not limited to) pop up events, exhibitions, advertising, curated exhibitions (all of which the teams design), we look at ways to build awareness, extend and develop funding possibilities, or change social perceptions. The teams leave with an extraordinary brand/look book for their portfolios that chronicles the process.

Check out the students’ work below:

Great work, team!

Design IV Student Project Spotlight: Days For Girls

We’re highlight three of the outstanding group projects created by students of John Beach’s fall Design IV: Advanced Design Practice course.

Next up: Days for Girls by Carla Pera and Man Ting Kong.

First John gives us an overview of the course:

Students get the opportunity to choose a real life non-profit organization to rebrand, refresh and reorganize the public’s perception of its value. We start with branding, and through web presence, social media and virtually any other method such as (but not limited to) pop up events, exhibitions, advertising, curated exhibitions (all of which the teams design), we look at ways to build awareness, extend and develop funding possibilities, or change social perceptions. The teams leave with an extraordinary brand/look book for their portfolios that chronicles the process.

Check out the students’ work below:

Excellent work, Carla Pera and Man Ting Kong!

Summer Quarter Getty Design Studio Placement

Work done by previous DCA intern, Naomi Hotta

Work done by previous appointee, Naomi Hotta

Applications due Sunday, June 10.

THE WORK
The student will partner with a lead designer to develop graphic design solutions for various print ephemera connected with the Getty, including Education and Performing Arts. Work will involve collaborations with internal clients, production and web staff to coordinate deliverables. The Design Studio is a fast-paced, deadline-driven, creative environment that develops high quality design solutions.

THE SITUATION
The Design Studio at the Getty will offer a fully set-up MAC workstation for the successful student candidate. Work must be carried out at the Getty Center Design Studio.  The position is 12 hours per week, with preference for 2 six hour days (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday 8:30 – 3:30 with 1 hour lunch break).

PAG 39-40

Getty Center

QUALIFICATIONS
• Working knowledge of InDesign and other Adobe CC programs.
• Ability to generate a design solution quickly and carry it through to completion.
• Strong communication skills.
• DCA certificate candidate.

APPLY
Send your resume, cover letter and three work samples to dca@uclaextension.edu by Sunday, June 10.

Need help with your cover letter? Kate can help: dca@uclaextension.edu

Design IV Student Project Spotlight: LA Makerspace

It’s our pleasure to highlight some of the outstanding group projects created by students of John Beach’s fall Design IV: Advanced Design Practice course!

First John gives us an overview of the course:

Students get the opportunity to choose a real life non-profit organization to rebrand, refresh and reorganize the public’s perception of its value. We start with branding, and through web presence, social media and virtually any other method such as (but not limited to) pop up events, exhibitions, advertising, curated exhibitions (all of which the teams design), we look at ways to build awareness, extend and develop funding possibilities, or change social perceptions. The teams leave with an extraordinary brand/look book for their portfolios that chronicles the process.

We begin with the team comprised of Shadalene Adamos and Natalie Mizrahi. The name of the non-profit organization the group rebranded is LA Makerspace:

Excellent work, Shadalene and Natalie!

The 2018 Certificate Graduation ceremony is fast approaching!

DATE: Friday, June 22, 2018

LOCATION: Royce Hall, UCLA Main Campus

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: : Frank Pearce, Co-Founder and Chief Development Officer, Blizzard Entertainment, Technical Mgmt Program Keynote Speaker and Participant, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Alum

THEME: Dare to Dream

PROCESS TO PARTICIPATE:

  1. OPT-IN

Students who are potentially eligible to participate (have completed their certificate between Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018 or are in progress to complete by Summer 2018) received an email with instructions to log in to Destiny to complete the Opt-In application to request an E-invitation in May. The deadline to opt-in is Tuesday, May 1, 2018, after which students will have to contact their Program Rep or SAO to be manually added.

  1. E – INVITATIONS

Graduation e-invitations will go out by email in early May to those students who opted in. This invitation will include ticketing information. Tickets are available for purchase at the UCLA Central Ticket Office (CTO) via link in the e-invitation. While graduates do not have to pay for their ticket, they must still obtain one via ticketmaster, print and bring with them for admission to Royce Hall. Four (4) additional tickets may be purchased for guests at $20 each.

For more detailed information regarding graduation, including attendance & ticket information and a graduation day schedule, please visit: http://graduation.uclaextension.edu.

Should you have any additional questions, please feel free to reach out!

Interview with recent DCA graduate Jonas Lin

Congrats to designer Jonas Lin, who recently completed the DCA program! He shares more about his experiences here:

Tell us how you got interested in design and what brought you to the DCA program.

It is my belief that design is one of the fastest and most direct forms of communication. A good design can even break the boundaries of nationality and language. In my past experience with clients, when I come up with a design that successfully communicates their message to their target audience, I get a sense of utmost fulfillment, and this fulfillment is what drives my passion for design.

I had already been working in the design industry for several years before coming to America, and my designs were heavily influenced by Asian philosophy and aesthetics. But as time passed, I wanted to explore and experience with Western design elements, so I came to the US to learn more about this area that I am unfamiliar with. Because LA is known for its diverse cultural environment, and because UCLA Extension offers a variety of courses as well as instructors with real-world experience, I chose the DCA program to enrich my design skills.

What were your favorite courses and why?

Actually, I enjoyed a lot of the courses. When you pretend that each and every assignment is a real case, you will naturally find the fun in the courses (of course, this also comes with more pressure). I did learn the most from the courses that involves typography, for example, Typography and Publication Design, and the reason is simple: that was the field I was most unfamiliar with, and was the most challenging for me as a designer who mainly worked with Chinese characters and not Roman letters. The relationship between individual letters, between words, and even between lines and paragraphs all play an important role in determining the final look of the design piece, and a small change in these relationships can result in drastic differences in the outcome. Furthermore, you also need to understand the historical backgrounds and characteristics of the different types in order to legitimize your design. That is why I find typography so interesting.

If the phone rang right now and somebody offered you your dream design job, who are they, where do they work, and what’s the job?

To be honest, I don’t have an answer to this question. Or more precisely, I am open to all possibilities. I am the type of person who likes to compete with myself, and for every task that I take on, I like to push my own limits and think outside the box. I dislike being told that there’s something I can’t do, and when people ask what kind of jobs I’m good at, I often tell them “I don’t know,” because I like a lot of things and I can do a decent job no matter what I do. I certainly enjoy being a problem-solver, and being a designer, one is constantly solving problems with branding, merchandising, packaging, and marketing. If the phone rang right now, I would probably just ask, “What is the case that we need to work on?”

Where do you see yourself professionally in 5 years?

My goal is to become a creative director. I want to have the opportunity to interact directly with clients, to understand the story behind their brands, and to solve client’s problems using the design process while focusing on the big picture. I’ve always liked team work, and it is an exciting thing to be able to assign roles in a team based on each team member’s skill set in order to complete a project. This means that I will need to take on the role of a navigator, as opposed to being a designer that sits in front of the computer all day making graphics look perfect.

I know that I still have a lot of weaknesses to overcome, but I believe some of these weaknesses can be transformed into advantages. Being a foreigner, I expect myself to one day break the cultural boundaries of design, as this may be where the demand is in the global market we are in.

 

Congrats, Jonas!

Course spotlight: AR/MR/VR for Immersive Content: Experience, Game & Media

We’re thrilled to be offering coursework this spring in Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality/Mixed Reality as we ramp up our game design course offerings. Instructor Jason Yim tells us all about what students can expect in this exciting course:

Why is this course important for my design education?

AR/MR will become the next computing paradigm. Just like smart-phones and apps changed human behavior and our connection to technology in a matter of years, AR/MR will have the same global effect. Secondly, designing for AR/MR/VR is very different from print or normal design for screen space. The user experience is played out over 3D space and blends with the physical environment, resulting in its own design language and best practices. And lastly, the case studies and guest speakers in this course will offer access and visibility into some of the world’s biggest brands and clients.

Do you have a sample assignment we’ll be working on?

Students will develop and present a concept for a real-world client and brief in mind. During this process they will create a prototype for user-testing in order to validate their concept. The prototype format will depend on the skill set of the student:
• Non-design students can create a paper mock up
• Digital Designers can create a click-through prototype
• 3D artists can produce a POV video
• Coders can create a working UNITY prototype
We will have a dedicated “user-testing” day for students and guests to review each other’s work and to capture results and insights.

What will I take away from this course?

You’ll feel like you spent 11 weeks IN the industry and not just learning about it from the outside.

Day one will start by giving you hands on access to several AR/VR/MR devices. By the end of the course, you will leave with an appreciation of the real-world challenges and opportunities from case-studies and guest speakers as well as your own personal experience developing, prototyping and testing a concept.

Thanks so much, Jason!

Enroll in AR/MR/VR for Immersive Content: Experience, Game & Media today!

 

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