explore. experience. expand.
Archive by Author

Interview with UX Student Janelle Gatchallian

AC5T8939We had the opportunity to interview one of our UX students about her time with us so far and her advice for new UX students. She also shared with us one of her class projects — check it out below!

  1.   Tell us about how you got interested in UX, and why you chose UCLA Extension.

I majored in art history in college but I would have been happy focusing on anthropology as well. Observing, listening, interviewing, and approaching a situation with fresh eyes all come naturally to me. When I learned about the application of design thinking and user experience lenses to questions and problems–all of which reminded me of ethnographic work–I was intrigued!

I wanted to take a UX class in person and learn with classmates through group activities like presenting, partnering up, as well as giving and receiving feedback. When I found out that UCLA Extension is one of the few places that offers progressive UX courses, I wanted to be part of its community. UCLA Extension’s Westwood campus is also close to my workplace (the Getty), so the location helps, especially when commuting from work in the evenings.

  1.   For someone who is new to UX, what should they know about getting started?

In every step of the process, think about the user. That seems like a hackneyed saying, but seriously, by the time you’re, say, in round 4 of prototypes and it’s just been approved by stakeholders, initial user research can easily get lost.

Additionally, be careful of getting carried away by new software. Sketching on paper is still the fastest and unrestrained way to materialize an idea!

  1.   What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

I’ve only taken two courses at UCLA Extension. Both were about UX–one with Thomas Dillmann and one with Julia Morton. I enjoyed both!

  1.   What would be your dream job?

I’ve been thinking a lot about creating immersive reading experiences lately, so a job (like the one I have now) that would let me do that is a dream. There were days when being privy to the author’s world meant curling up to a book or a newspaper in solitude, perhaps under the covers in darkness. Now that we have adopted our mobile phones as quick and superhuman sources of information, our reading experiences have already become much more immersive. Audio, video, and three-dimensional works are now part of our books. Recent discoveries in iris recognition, artificial intelligence, adaptive learning, and animations are also enhancing our ability to take in what we read. So I’m excited about the possibilities of smart reading powered by machines.

  1.   What are you working on right now?

One of our projects at the Getty is an ebook mobile app that features musical and performance scores in our collection. These artworks are multi-dimensional and come in audio, video, and 3D formats. The scores require scholarly expertise to understand, which puts the Getty in a position to publish interpretive content about them. For example, a musical score is going to come alive with a tap with a user seeing it annotated and hearing audio playback at the same time. That’s pretty superhuman! I worked on this project while in Julia Morton’s UX II: Mobile First class. Here is some sample course work:

Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_1 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_2 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_4 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_5 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_6 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_7 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_8 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_9

Design II final project presentation: Fiona Chen

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Fiona Chen shared her work with us:

Name: Foray

Fiona says:

This project was the most challenging, yet fulfilling projects I have done so far in the DCA certificate program! I chose to create an entire bakery/cafe based around a rustic, modern hip, homemade vibe that is quite popular right now. “Foray” was a name taken from the French word from forest, with an “American” twist to the name for readability.

I tried to appeal to a more hipster audience of late twenty and thirty year olds, as well as young, up and coming families in places like Atwater Village or South Pasadena. I was very much inspired by the look of cabins, forest (and trees of course), and a feeling of warmth and coziness.

I wanted the whole brand to convey this vibe by making it look a little loose, and handmade, and with the use of warm colors. The trend right now is a lot of artisan, modern, hip coffee shops, and I wanted to explore the trend with more of a craft and rustic perspective to it. The whole process was definitely long and hard, but it really was a good challenge in terms of seeing what worked and didn’t in terms of building boxes, and using new processes like screen printing. I had never made boxes before, and Henry really challenged us to think “outside the box,” literally. I felt really good about how my bakery box “kit” turned out, and with a little trial and error, I think it worked out well and was a different way of presenting packaged goods. I had a blast with this project and it definitely presented me with several new challenges, in a very good way. I hope that came through in the final result of my project!

Project 1 was a fragrance brand that was completely different from my second project. It leaned toward more of a minimal vibe towards an upscale audience. The result was “Opus” meaning composition. I used a diefold for the box (which required a lot of trial and error!) and a clear opacity adhesive for the bottle. My lookbook used different size cut pages to emphasize the shapes and lines I used as inspiration for this look.

 

Great work, Fiona!

Design II final project presentation: Drew Fransler

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Drew Fransler shared his work with us:

Name: Thirsty Spaniel Brewery & Public House

 

Drew says:

Thirsty Spaniel Brewery & Public House is exactly what it sounds like. The pub’s purpose is to drive business to its line of beers sold at liquor and grocery stores, which it does by offering beer flights and complimenting with a menu of updated classic pub fare. Its aim is to offer a great product and experience of authentic, high-quality food and beer served without pretension. Located in the Chicago suburbs, its clientele is a mix of married and single people of middle class backgrounds and better. It does a brisk happy hour, catering to commuters arriving at the nearby train station. On weekends, particularly over the lunch hour, it is a family- and dog-friendly neighborhood gathering spot.

The branding is designed to be simple, impactful and versatile to play well with a broad range of packaging designs and color palettes. The beers carry a primarily canine theme and the six pack cartons are designed for maximum shelf presence. Similarly, the cans and bottles are designed to have enough presence to be distinguishable at a tailgate party or backyard cookout. The two mortal enemies of fresh beer are air and sunlight, and cans are most effective against both. Smaller-batch special edition beers are bottled. The Dimension Triple IPA bottle is an anaglyphic 3-D image (contact me for a free pair of 3-D glasses).

The menu is designed to accommodate the entirety of offerings in one piece of collateral. Food on one side, beverages on the reverse. When attached to a clipboard, the beer menu is the serving mechanism for beer flights. The beer list is organized in a matrix from light to heavy and malty to hoppy, which allows for selection and shows how each beer relates to others. Tray liners and wraps are designed to reinforce the brand without competing with the presentation of the food.

 

Great work, Drew!

Design II final projects presentation: Caitlin Madill

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Caitlin Madill shared her work (two projects!) with us:

Name: Hex

Top 5 Descriptors: Edgy, Independent, Powerful, Commanding, and Wry

Target persona:
Age: 18-40
Gender: Female
Nationalities: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe,     and Asia
Income Range: $1,000-$5,000 per month
Average Income: $3,500 per month
Approximate/Relevant Costs: $150 per bottle of fragrance

Your inspiration for the project: I wanted to create something for young women that didn’t fit within the normal constructs of what society considers to be “feminine:” soft, flowery, pretty.  This fragrance is for the bold, unapologetic, edgy woman who embraces being dark and twisty.

Anything interesting that came up in the design/revision process: I had my heart set on using a St. Germain bottle for the fragrance because it was so beautiful and elegant, but I had some difficulty when it came to customizing it for the project.  In retrospect, I should have gone with a more simple bottle that would have lent itself more to applying branding elements.

Name: Sterling & Baxter

Top 5 Descriptors: Refined, High Quality, Graceful, Timeless, Classic

Target persona:
Age: 18-80
Gender: Male and Female
Nationalities: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe, and Asia
Income Range: $2,000-$3,500 per month
Average Income: $3,500 per month
Approximate/Relevant Costs: $15 per box of tea

Your inspiration for the project: I had the pleasure of enjoying high tea at Fortnum & Mason in Piccadilly Circus in April 2015.  It was a lovely experience and the quality and refinement of the atmosphere, tea, and food really stuck with me.  I wanted to create a brand of teas in the United States which evoked a similar feeling – one of quality, timelessness, and grace.  My aim was for the brand to be higher brow and fancier than Lipton and Twinnings (which are more generic and pedestrian) or Tazo and Teavanna (which are more down to earth and modern).
Anything interesting that came up in the design/revision process: I learned the hard way that silk screen printing really doesn’t work well on ceramic.  I attempted to brand a ceramic teapot, teacup, and saucer by using a custom silk screen that I created with the Sterling & Baxter logo, but unfortunately the slick nature of a ceramic surface and concave shape of the objects made it impossible to apply the logo without smudging or warping.

Great work, Caitlin!

Doug Aitken’s Art in Context with Roni Feinstein

This fall we are pleased to announce a new course with instructor Roni Feinstein.

Doug Aitken’s Art in Context

This class takes as its point of focus Doug Aitken: Electric Earth, an exhibition that offers the opportunity to review work of the past twenty years by this groundbreaking Los Angeles-based artist.   Aitken is best known for his pioneering work in video art, which not only rethinks the parameters of video in terms of the architectural spaces it might inhabit, but also with regard to narrative and content.   Any number of other artists, among them Bill Viola, Diana Thater, Pipilloti Rist and Ragnar Gunnarsson, also work with multi-screen video projections and Aitken’s work will be considered in relation theirs.  Aitken’s artistic practice also includes photo-based work, sculpture, collage, Earthworks, multi-media performance, participation pieces and more and these too will be related to work by his contemporaries.   It will be seen that while parallels maybe drawn between Aitken’s art and that of others, there is much that is unique and that sets his work apart.  Defining these qualities will be among the class’s aim as the exhibition is explored in depth.

Thursday, October 27, 11am – 1pm: classroom lecture

Thursday November 3 and 10, 11am – 1pm: tour Doug Aitken: Electric Earth at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

To enroll, you may use this link: https://www.uclaextension.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=42735610 Or call our registration office directly at (310) 825-9971.

Instructor, Roni Feinstein, Ph.D., wrote a blog post on Doug Aitken’s retrospective, which can be accessed at the following link: http://www.ronifeinstein.com/1736/doug-aitken-electric-earth-at-the-geffen/

doug-aitken-jpeg

Installation view of Doug Aitken, Black Mirror, 2011, at Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, July 9 – September 27,  2015, photo by Norbert Migule

 

Meet new DCA Instructor Tzeitel Sorrosa

tsorrosaHere at UCLA Extension, we’re proud to welcome instructors from a wide range of professional and cultural backgrounds. Tzeitel Sorrosa is a multicultural creative director who brings her diverse experience to our Illustrator II online course beginning in winter quarter. Born in Costa Rica, Tzeitel was raised in Ecuador and received her education at Boston College.

She says, “My most valuable training, however, has come through my extensive travel, diverse areas of studies, and consistent curiosity to explore beyond the world around me.”

Below she shares how her artistic intuition has shaped her work, as well as some info on what you can expect in her upcoming course.

What brought you to this field?

During my childhood, I frequently expressed my thoughts, feelings, and wild ideas through doodles and sketches almost always with graphite or charcoal, and Stonehenge paper. In unstoppable mode, I graffiti-ed everywhere in school, including my text books, wooden desks and freshly-painted walls (to the chagrin of my teachers). Doodling has been an excellent channel of communication for me because it has given me much room for imagination to continue to explore freely across multi-surfaces and formats. I knew at a very young age I would be a fine artist, but I did not know I would evolve into a digital artist. Technology forced me to evolve. Mobile devices have become vehicles of unlimited potential for self-expression and imagination. These devices are all fueled with unlimited energy awaiting to be channeled through YOU to create surprisingly memorable and beautiful things.

 

Tell us about an especially rewarding project you’ve worked on and why you enjoyed it so much.

I creative directed and designed the American Diabetes Association’s Welcome Kit for newly diagnosed children with Type 1 diabetes. The concept for the packaging initially started out as a very complex hexagon resembling a sugar molecule, made up of tangram shapes that kids would unfold as colorful puzzle pieces. As much as this design was engaging and playful, the costs to produce it were prohibitive. In the many rounds of feedback from our stakeholders, the iterative process took us back to a simpler but more intuitive model. Yet, the final product was one that still embraced the three key emotions I wanted to convey in the initial welcome kit design: Courage. Wisdom. Hope.

The project felt very special from the start, but it was also a journey of discovery. In design, one of the most important steps to consider is the iterative process. As designers, we’re usually biased in favor of our very first idea, and we say “Eureka!” even before we build a prototype. Prototyping, however, is not just a way to test an idea, but is also a doorway to a more meaningful conversation about the needs of your users.

 tz2

Why is your course, Illustrator II, important for my design education?

Teaching creative applications, such as Adobe Illustrator, is a doorway to constant learning. For the always-thirsty, curious mind, it creates not only a 2-way channel of giving and receiving, but an opportunity for collaboration and personal growth. There is always something new to learn from anyone and everyone, and you will be the beneficiary of a storehouse of perspectives, ideas, experiences, and information that you can later resource to in your next project.

Do you have a sample assignment?

In one of our assignments, we will be recreating IBM’s logo into 3D type miniature office buildings utilizing Illustrator’s powerful isometric tools.

Welcome, Tzeitel!

Exploring Street Art visits Christina Angelina Studio

On one of their recent field trips, instructor Lizy Dastin was able to arrange a meeting at Christina Angelina studio for her students in Exploring Street Art. They met with the artist to hear about her work and process, as well as get a close-up look at some works in progress.

From her website: Christina Angelina is an internationally renowned artist who was born, raised and is now based in Venice, California. Her rigorous work ethic led to the completion of 54 murals in 2014 alone.

Angelina’s favorite projects typically take place in remote locations, off the beaten path. She strives to provide a source of inspiration in communities relatively untouched by art. Her interactive process engages and forms lasting relationships with locals, which she then channels into a finalized piece. A thirst for adventure keeps her on the road, traveling and working.

While her highly sought-after work has beautified urban landscapes, it’s also strengthened surroundings for the following clients: Nike, Nylon Magazine, Microsoft, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, CAA,

img_9418img_9415img_9414img_9413

 

 

 

 

Interview with DCA Graduate Aneesha Bharadwaj

In UCLA Extensions we have many inspirational graduates who are pushing towards development. Meet Aneesha s DCA graduate who shares with us some of the projects she has worked on after UCLA Extension certificate program. If you wish to learn more about Aneesha, visit her online portfolio at https://www.behance.net/Aneesha_Bharadwaj.

What brought you to the DCA program?

I have always been interested and curious about what makes good design. Questions like who is the user? What does he/ she like? Why am I designing this product for them? Why will they use my product? What will they be feeling and experiencing when they will use my product? These are important things I keep in mind and hope to answer with each of my designs.

Having my background in product design and design strategy it was interactive-projectreally challenging to create design that engages the user and keeps him/her excited. My prior work experience in India was to get user research for consumer electronics. Find out why the existing product is failing and how our new design could help solve the problems. Then come back to the table after gathering data and map out user journeys. That’s what got me excited and more interested about user and interaction design because in the end if your user likes your product and continues using it without complains it is successful.

I was attracted to the DCA program at UCLA Extension for the variety of courses being offered. The advantage of joining the program is that there are various choices of electives which include Visual Design, UX, Web Design, Interaction Design and more.

What were your favorite courses and why?

I have taken lot classes at Extension from Visual to UX to Interaction design. The instructors have been inspiring and motivating me to push my limits. I found design with electronics most fun. Playing with Arduino circuit boards and designing user interactions is the most intriguing. To a designer you want to hear from your user/s that your design is purposeful and solves the problem what they previously had. spatial-typography

In the end of the day I want to combine my prior and new skills towards designing a product/ service that keeps my user/s participate and excited with my design.interactive-project2

How have the UCLA Extension classes helped improve your work, and or expanded your professional development in the field?

The DCA program has taught me to be more professional, dedicated and passionate for the art and design industry. To work in a team, generating ideas, presenting in front of them and getting valuable feedback. Showing your enthusiasm by not just delivering what is needed but doing much more that gives it the extra edge.

I was fortunate to get an opportunity to work at the Getty Museum during my study here. Also events with AIGA constantly kept me in contact with other designers and events.

Passionate about design, storytelling and technology, I have a created variety of work in the field of interaction design, visual design and UX. My aim is to create compelling design to enhance user interactions. I thank the DCA faculty and the program for being so diverse.

Explain the current project with Silicon Beach.

This project called ‘in type 2016’, was in collaboration with AIGA Los Angeles held at Looking design studio. There were 10 students from different schools across Los Angeles. Each of us had to design a typographic poster showcasing a selected neighborhood.

02_materials

04_progress2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My chosen neighborhood was Silicon Beach.  From my initial idea I wanted to achieve the tech feel from Silicon Beach, the motherboard one where the type ‘silicon’ is set. My concept was to show the poster infused with tech and innovation. Materials used were rivets which led to the formation of the the grid structure of 1 inch squares. I used red strings for the type to stand out from the base.

silicon-beach_photoshoot

I used materials like rivets, red string, and card paper on a white background.

We had formal photo-shoot of our work done in the photo lab. It was an amazing workshop weekend. Productive for the limited 2 days to finish off the poster.

And we are going to exhibit our work at the A+D museum on Nov 5, 2016.

06_photoshoot

silicon-beach_final

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the phone rang right now and somebody offered you your dream design job, who are they, where do they work, and what’s the job?

My dream job would be designing solutions that have long term impact. Be it digital agencies and design studios where I can keep learning and growing as a designer and focus my skills to enhance better user interactions. I am fascinated to work at places where the focus on building purpose and creating impact is through collaboration, creativity and innovation. If I had to name one company it would be IBM interactive experience and the the job would a visual interaction designer

Where do you see yourself professionally in 5 years?

Five years from now I see myself as an interactive design director still very much passionate about design, technology and my work.

 

 

Interview with DCA Graduate Amy Lynn Grover

Amy Lynn Grover is a true artist that enjoys photography and design. In her interview she shares with us the work she has created with the skills she attained through UCLA Extension DCA certificate program. To learn more about Amy and her work visit her website amylynngrover.com

What brought you to the DCA program?

Deep interest and commitment to art & design, plus a great imagination… I was a amy5professional model for sixteen years and  was looking for a change in life.. After many frustrating encounters with web designers, I taught myself to write code and learned how to do many things on my own. Something clicked… “This is what I am supposed to be doing!” I wanted to explore my passion for art design and photography; I knew it could be so much more.

What were your favorite courses and why?

I thoroughly enjoyed taking all of the courses; I learned a great deal from all my teachers and from class assignments. I found the projects the most useful in my learning experience.

As a designer, what does a potential project need to have for you to feel passionate about it?

Anything inspirational. I am especially drawn to work in the organic food, health, fitness, wellness, lifestyle and fashion arenas.

amy2

 

amyy

 

How have the UCLA Extension classes helped improve your work, and or expanded your professional development in the field?

The entire process. Design process, My process. Perspective…. Building blocks in working projects, taking things step by step.

UCLA Extension class assignments and projects were all imperative for my learning process; understanding concepts, experimenting and having the space to practice and make mistakes.

The most beneficial was the critiquing of assignments— this gave me perspective, looking at my own work as well as classmates. I learned a great deal from watching and evaluating others, as well as getting really great useful feedback on my work (things I needed to improve on and things I nailed).

As I continue to work as a stand alone freelance artist, (and greatly miss having 20 people around me nightly to critique), I value the importance of opinions; I continue to ask friends and family for their opinions; to get the perspectives of others. I also have found that my perspective changes once I step away and work at it later time. Assignments were like a sequence of many small fun jobs, the timeline, being pushed from all sorts of angles is all part of the job.

amy4

If the phone rang right now and somebody offered you your dream design job, who are they, where do they work, and what’s the job?

I am a freelance artist; I like space and freedom to work on a variety of projects that either interest or inspire me… I really enjoy figuring things out… problem solving. I love complexity.

What are you working on right now?

Aside from a new food company I am a part of creating and clients–  I have been working on some personal projects which entail a lot of photography.  I spend a lot of time playing and working in my garden— hands in the dirt growing flowers, vegetables and raising 50 chickens (the garden is my favorite place for inspiration).

Where do you see yourself professionally in 5 years?

Professionally… Art Directing, Designing and Photography. Personally… Holding space for a lot more art (photography, graphically and the combination of the two).

 

 

 

 

Interview with Photography Graduate Christian Alarcon

Christian Alarcon just finished his photography certificate at UCLA Extension. Below he shares with us his academic and professional experience. To see Christian’s work check out his portfolio at christianalarcon.com .

Tell us about how you got interested in Photography, and why you chose the UCLA Extension Photography certificate.

I came to UCLA Extension a few months after High School in Spring 2011. I originally enrolled aiming for the Design Communication Arts ch2certificate. About mid way through the program, I decided to take Photography II as an elective. The day after I signed up, I went out and purchased my first camera, a Canon Rebel T3 equipped with an 18-55mm lens. I was HOOKED! That camera was in my hands everywhere I’d go. I didn’t even know how to properly use it, I would click the button and just hope I’d make a photo. Once the Photography II course began it was like I entered a new world. I would sit in class viewing slideshows of work and listen to my instructor Masood Kamandy and fellow classmates talk about exposure, shutter speeds, ISO’s and I had no idea what they meant. Clearly going straight into Photography II wasn’t the smartest decision, but it’s what motivated me to learn more about my camera and the art of Photography. I took a break from the DCA program and continued taking photos and learning as much as I could about photography on my own. As soon as I felt more comfortable operating my camera, I enrolled myself in the Photography Certificate program and that’s when my passion really began to grow.

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

img_7363_2Be very patient! Being patient with art is so important because then you’re achieving what you really want to achieve. Experiment with different styles and find what gives you that rush of emotion. Photography isn’t a competition. There will be times where you look at other peoples work and think to yourself “why don’t my photos look as good as theirs?” Don’t compare yourself to other photographers; instead look at their work as inspiration to help you get better. Put your passion into the craft and develop your own style. The most important thing is to always have fun and remember that you can never really fail if you’re doing something you love. The last crucial piece of advice I can give is learning how to save and back up all of your files. One day you will go deep into your archives and find some hidden gems that at the time you did not think were so great. And learn how to edit your work non-destructively. You will go through many different editing phases, and you will be very upset when you want to edit a certain old photo differently but you damaged the original copy.

 

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

I enjoyed all of my classes at Extension, but I’ll have to say Street Photography was definitely my favorite. From the moment I got my camera, Street Photography was an art that always fascinated me. Taught by the legendary John Weiss, this class really opened my eyes to the different elements of capturing great photos in the streets. Three of our class sessions were field trips, which consisted of us meeting at a certain location in the city and shooting together as a group. This gave us the opportunity to be out in the field while getting advice from our instructor, which I thought was really special. Weiss shaped me to become not only a better photographer, but also a professional. His passion and craft towards the art is truly something amazing and I can only hope to reach such a pinnacle one day. It was an honor being taught and guided by John Weiss, and for that I am very thankful.

christian-alarcon-08

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

There are so many things I wish to accomplish with Photography. My biggest dream of all is to travel. I would love to experience and capture the many different cultures of the world. Seeing the work of the greats like Steve McCurry, Alex Webb, and my former instructor John Weiss is what keeps that dream alive. I also hope to open my own studio here in Los Angeles, a creative work-space where I can offer my services and showcase my work. The possibilities with Photography are endless; as long I have a camera in my hands I’ll be happy.

 

What are you working on right now?img_5445

I am currently just taking my work day by day. I go out into the city with my camera every chance I get. Los Angeles is an amazing place to live and find inspiration. Everyday is a new story worth capturing. In today’s age people are so caught up in their daily routines and social medias that they don’t find the time to go out and experience the greatness their city has to offer; the people, the culture, the architecture, the food, and so much more. The work I continue to curate will eventually become a book where I can share all of these elements that make our city of Los Angeles such an iconic and historical place.

windows-10-key windows-10-iso windows-10-product-key windows-10-activation-key windows-10-pro-key windows-10-education-key windows-10-enterprise-key windows-10-home-key windows-7-key-sale windows-10-key windows-7-key office-2016-key office-2013-key office-2010-key