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Course Spotlight: Photographing Architecture in the City

 

Images by instructor Richard Langendorf

This spring, we will be offering a new course with instructor Richard Langendorf, Photographing Architecture in the City. A unique offering, this course would appeal to students interested in photography, architecture, art and art history, and urban planning and design. The diversity of backgrounds and experiences should make for an interesting array of creative projects.

Each student will work on a self-initiated project,  selecting a site for the focus of his or her work in the course. The place may be anywhere in the Los Angeles region – urban or suburban. It may be a work of architecture, an urban space, the urban edge, or the like.  This work will proceed in stages, examining the site from varying perspectives, including light, detail, documentary, and poetic interpretation, and ending as a portfolio of photographs that express the qualities of a particular place, sequenced as one or more stories.

Below you’ll see a list of class lecture topics, technical demonstrations, and creative assignments. To enroll, click here, or call (310) 825-9971.

Lectures on Architectural Photography
Early History, Wonders of World, American Topographic Views
Pictorialism, Modernist Views-Europe & US
Documentary: Progressive Era & Reform, Great Depression
Modern View: Experimental, Rise of Color Art Photography
Arch. Journals, Modern Arch. Photographers (Commercial), architecture without architects; architecture in color, landmarks & special events
Dusseldorf Academy, New Topographics, Learning from Las Vegas, Modernism reappraised
New Documentary: DATAR, etc.; architecture- from commercial to art photography
Post Modern: where architecture and photography merge
Man-altered landscapes, cityscapes of change
Constructed, Staged, and Invented Image
Final Project, no lecture or future of architectural photography

Select Demonstrations/Technique

Equipment selection
Checklist for planning and shooting
Shooting: lens selection, aperture-shutter-ISO trade-offs, etc.
Shooting: composition, parallax and parallax correction
Shooting: low light, twilight, night photography, TPE
Shooting: HDR and Pano, and post in ACR/Lightroom
Post: working non-destructively
Post: ACR-basic panel, curves, lens correction, and FX
Post: noise reduction, sharpening, mixed light conditions
Post: HDR and Panorama, Photoshop and other software
Post: enhancing/replacing sky

Assignments

Assignment 1: Site Proposal
Assignment 2: Getting Started, Research Paper
Assignment 3: Detail
Assignment 4: Time
Assignment 5: Light
Assignment 6: Context
Assignment 7: Poetics / Interpretation
Assignment 8: Documentary
Assignment 9, Post-Modern
Assignment 10, Outline, Final Project
Deadline to update Previous assignments
Assignment 11:Final Project
Assignment 12 Print Version, Final Project

 

Interview with Photography Student Joe Stehly

We always love hearing about the diverse backgrounds and experiences of our students. In this interview, recent photography certificate graduate Joe Stehly talks about what he learned in the program, and where he’s hoping to take his work in the future.

How did you get interested in photography, and why did you choose the UCLA Extension Photography Certificate?

I am an aerospace engineer by trade, but also took many art classes growing up.  I still really enjoy art and feel that it is very important to continue growing artistically. I have taken art classes focused other mediums since graduating college, but photography is the genre that speaks the loudest to me. My old roommate is a professional photographer and some of his black and white images sparked my interest.  He taught me some basics and I continued to learn on my own until I reached the point where I could not progress any further.  I needed professional instruction. Around this time I took a management class at UCLA Extension and saw a catalog for other class offerings during a break. While looking through the catalog the photography curriculum caught my eye. I decided to give Photography I a try and I really liked it so I enrolled in the certificate program.

For someone who is new to photography, what should they know about getting started?

I think the first thing to remember when starting the program is that everyone in the class with you is there for the same reason that you are: to become a better photographer. These classmates end up becoming close friends and people you can collaborate with on later projects.

Similarly, the instructors are focused on making you a better photographer. They have great real-world experience and teach you a lot about the business of photography and the creative process in addition to technical instruction.

What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

Two classes that I took stood out as favorite of mine. The first was Lighting I with Kevin Merrill. I had never been in a studio before or attempted elaborate lighting setups. Both were intimidating to me prior to taking the course. However, after learning some basics I found that many creative avenues were opened to me by understanding how to use light. I found that many other classes, as well, pushed me out of my comfort zone and enabled me to round out my skill set. These new techniques that I was exposed to are not only interesting, but they allowed me to grow and expand creatively in ways that would not otherwise be possible.

The other class that really helped me grow was the Photographic Portfolio class. This was the final class that I took and I feel like it brought me full circle. The structure of the classes forces you to focus on one specific genre while creating a cohesive portfolio. I focused on Black and White Urban Landscape for the portfolio and was really able to fine-tune my skills. The instructor, David Daigle, is extremely detail oriented (every pixel matters) and this enabled me to better critique my own photos both compositionally and during post-processing. I learned an enormous amount in this class.

Where do you hope to take your practice in the future?

I plan to continue working on urban landscape photography while studying what the pioneers in the field, such as Julius Schulman, created.  The UCLA extension courses helped me find my voice artistically in this area and I will continue to refine that through various projects. I have also started setting up a home studio and am excited about the opportunities that it will enable.

What are you working on right now?

I have a few projects that I am currently working on. One is a continuation of a project that I did for my Documentary and Landscape Photography class where I look at the public/private school divide in Pasadena through photography. I am also working capturing more buildings throughout Los Angeles and soon I am going to Europe for a vacation in order to get some new subject matter.

ASMP Talk on Freelancing with Todd Bigelow

Instructor Todd Bigelow, who leads our Business of Photography workshop, will be giving a virtual interview with ASMP on being a freelance photographer.

ASMP Talk: Freelancing with Todd Bigelow – Tuesday, February 21st @ 11amPT/2pmET

Join ASMP Executive Director, Tom Kennedy, in a virtual interview with LA-based freelance photographer, Todd Bigelow, to discuss the many issues – building a portfolio, making client connections, licensing, protecting your works – facing freelance photographers in today’s fast-paced, tumultuous times. Following the one-on-one interview, Tom will open up the discussion with Todd to include a Q&A with webinar attendees. You can register here: https://www.asmp.org/webinars/strictly-business-webinar-february-21st-freelancing-todd-bigelow/. 

Los Angeles based freelance photographer Todd Bigelow has handled assignment work for more than twenty-five years for some of the world’s leading publications, non-profits and corporations including Sports Illustrated, National Geographic Traveler, Smithsonian, Time, ESPN.com, Newsweek, People, The NY Times Magazine, Costco, Target, The James Irvine Foundation and others. While at the LA Times he contributed to two team Pulitzer Prizes for coverage of the LA Riots and Northridge Earthquake. Portions of his long term project documenting immigration have been exhibited internationally and several images reside in the permanent collection at the California Museum of Photography and the Oakland Museum of California.  His workshop, The Business of Photography, is offered by leading universities, professional photography organizations and photography conferences around the country and has been named three times as a “fantastic” and “inspiring” workshop by Photoshelter.  Todd also teaches photography and photojournalism courses at California State University-Northridge and UCLA Extension.

Spring Quarter Getty Design Studio Placement

Work done by previous DCA intern, Naomi Hotta

Work done by previous appointee, Naomi Hotta

Applications due Sunday, March 12th.

THE WORK
The student will partner with a lead designer to develop graphic design solutions for various print ephemera connected with the Getty, including Education and Performing Arts. Work will involve collaborations with internal clients, production and web staff to coordinate deliverables. The Design Studio is a fast-paced, deadline-driven, creative environment that develops high quality design solutions.

THE SITUATION
The Design Studio at the Getty will offer a fully set-up MAC workstation for the successful student candidate. Work must be carried out at the Getty Center Design Studio.  The position is 12 hours per week, with preference for 2 six hour days (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday 8:30 – 3:30 with 1 hour lunch break).

PAG 39-40

Getty Center

QUALIFICATIONS
• Working knowledge of InDesign and other Adobe CC programs.
• Ability to generate a design solution quickly and carry it through to completion.
• Strong communication skills.
• DCA certificate candidate.

APPLY
Send your resume, cover letter and three work samples to dca@uclaextension.edu by Sunday, March 12th.

Kate is on maternity leave, but another advisor would be happy to review your resume and/or sample work if you’d like to make an advising appt. before the deadline by calling 310-206-1422.

Interview with UX Student Janelle Gatchallian

AC5T8939We had the opportunity to interview one of our UX students about her time with us so far and her advice for new UX students. She also shared with us one of her class projects — check it out below!

  1.   Tell us about how you got interested in UX, and why you chose UCLA Extension.

I majored in art history in college but I would have been happy focusing on anthropology as well. Observing, listening, interviewing, and approaching a situation with fresh eyes all come naturally to me. When I learned about the application of design thinking and user experience lenses to questions and problems–all of which reminded me of ethnographic work–I was intrigued!

I wanted to take a UX class in person and learn with classmates through group activities like presenting, partnering up, as well as giving and receiving feedback. When I found out that UCLA Extension is one of the few places that offers progressive UX courses, I wanted to be part of its community. UCLA Extension’s Westwood campus is also close to my workplace (the Getty), so the location helps, especially when commuting from work in the evenings.

  1.   For someone who is new to UX, what should they know about getting started?

In every step of the process, think about the user. That seems like a hackneyed saying, but seriously, by the time you’re, say, in round 4 of prototypes and it’s just been approved by stakeholders, initial user research can easily get lost.

Additionally, be careful of getting carried away by new software. Sketching on paper is still the fastest and unrestrained way to materialize an idea!

  1.   What was your favorite UCLA Extension class and why?

I’ve only taken two courses at UCLA Extension. Both were about UX–one with Thomas Dillmann and one with Julia Morton. I enjoyed both!

  1.   What would be your dream job?

I’ve been thinking a lot about creating immersive reading experiences lately, so a job (like the one I have now) that would let me do that is a dream. There were days when being privy to the author’s world meant curling up to a book or a newspaper in solitude, perhaps under the covers in darkness. Now that we have adopted our mobile phones as quick and superhuman sources of information, our reading experiences have already become much more immersive. Audio, video, and three-dimensional works are now part of our books. Recent discoveries in iris recognition, artificial intelligence, adaptive learning, and animations are also enhancing our ability to take in what we read. So I’m excited about the possibilities of smart reading powered by machines.

  1.   What are you working on right now?

One of our projects at the Getty is an ebook mobile app that features musical and performance scores in our collection. These artworks are multi-dimensional and come in audio, video, and 3D formats. The scores require scholarly expertise to understand, which puts the Getty in a position to publish interpretive content about them. For example, a musical score is going to come alive with a tap with a user seeing it annotated and hearing audio playback at the same time. That’s pretty superhuman! I worked on this project while in Julia Morton’s UX II: Mobile First class. Here is some sample course work:

Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_1 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_2 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_4 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_5 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_6 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_7 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_8 Gatchalian_Janelle_UCLA_Ext_sample_project_070516_Page_9

Design II final project presentation: Fiona Chen

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Fiona Chen shared her work with us:

Name: Foray

Fiona says:

This project was the most challenging, yet fulfilling projects I have done so far in the DCA certificate program! I chose to create an entire bakery/cafe based around a rustic, modern hip, homemade vibe that is quite popular right now. “Foray” was a name taken from the French word from forest, with an “American” twist to the name for readability.

I tried to appeal to a more hipster audience of late twenty and thirty year olds, as well as young, up and coming families in places like Atwater Village or South Pasadena. I was very much inspired by the look of cabins, forest (and trees of course), and a feeling of warmth and coziness.

I wanted the whole brand to convey this vibe by making it look a little loose, and handmade, and with the use of warm colors. The trend right now is a lot of artisan, modern, hip coffee shops, and I wanted to explore the trend with more of a craft and rustic perspective to it. The whole process was definitely long and hard, but it really was a good challenge in terms of seeing what worked and didn’t in terms of building boxes, and using new processes like screen printing. I had never made boxes before, and Henry really challenged us to think “outside the box,” literally. I felt really good about how my bakery box “kit” turned out, and with a little trial and error, I think it worked out well and was a different way of presenting packaged goods. I had a blast with this project and it definitely presented me with several new challenges, in a very good way. I hope that came through in the final result of my project!

Project 1 was a fragrance brand that was completely different from my second project. It leaned toward more of a minimal vibe towards an upscale audience. The result was “Opus” meaning composition. I used a diefold for the box (which required a lot of trial and error!) and a clear opacity adhesive for the bottle. My lookbook used different size cut pages to emphasize the shapes and lines I used as inspiration for this look.

 

Great work, Fiona!

Design II final project presentation: Drew Fransler

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Drew Fransler shared his work with us:

Name: Thirsty Spaniel Brewery & Public House

 

Drew says:

Thirsty Spaniel Brewery & Public House is exactly what it sounds like. The pub’s purpose is to drive business to its line of beers sold at liquor and grocery stores, which it does by offering beer flights and complimenting with a menu of updated classic pub fare. Its aim is to offer a great product and experience of authentic, high-quality food and beer served without pretension. Located in the Chicago suburbs, its clientele is a mix of married and single people of middle class backgrounds and better. It does a brisk happy hour, catering to commuters arriving at the nearby train station. On weekends, particularly over the lunch hour, it is a family- and dog-friendly neighborhood gathering spot.

The branding is designed to be simple, impactful and versatile to play well with a broad range of packaging designs and color palettes. The beers carry a primarily canine theme and the six pack cartons are designed for maximum shelf presence. Similarly, the cans and bottles are designed to have enough presence to be distinguishable at a tailgate party or backyard cookout. The two mortal enemies of fresh beer are air and sunlight, and cans are most effective against both. Smaller-batch special edition beers are bottled. The Dimension Triple IPA bottle is an anaglyphic 3-D image (contact me for a free pair of 3-D glasses).

The menu is designed to accommodate the entirety of offerings in one piece of collateral. Food on one side, beverages on the reverse. When attached to a clipboard, the beer menu is the serving mechanism for beer flights. The beer list is organized in a matrix from light to heavy and malty to hoppy, which allows for selection and shows how each beer relates to others. Tray liners and wraps are designed to reinforce the brand without competing with the presentation of the food.

 

Great work, Drew!

Design II final projects presentation: Caitlin Madill

Instructor Henry Mateo is known for going above and beyond the call for his students, and this past quarter was no different. Henry arranged for his Design II: Collateral Communication students to share their final projects at Brand Knew where notable guest critiquers from the LA design scene were on hand to give our students feedback.

Student Caitlin Madill shared her work (two projects!) with us:

Name: Hex

Top 5 Descriptors: Edgy, Independent, Powerful, Commanding, and Wry

Target persona:
Age: 18-40
Gender: Female
Nationalities: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe,     and Asia
Income Range: $1,000-$5,000 per month
Average Income: $3,500 per month
Approximate/Relevant Costs: $150 per bottle of fragrance

Your inspiration for the project: I wanted to create something for young women that didn’t fit within the normal constructs of what society considers to be “feminine:” soft, flowery, pretty.  This fragrance is for the bold, unapologetic, edgy woman who embraces being dark and twisty.

Anything interesting that came up in the design/revision process: I had my heart set on using a St. Germain bottle for the fragrance because it was so beautiful and elegant, but I had some difficulty when it came to customizing it for the project.  In retrospect, I should have gone with a more simple bottle that would have lent itself more to applying branding elements.

Name: Sterling & Baxter

Top 5 Descriptors: Refined, High Quality, Graceful, Timeless, Classic

Target persona:
Age: 18-80
Gender: Male and Female
Nationalities: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Europe, and Asia
Income Range: $2,000-$3,500 per month
Average Income: $3,500 per month
Approximate/Relevant Costs: $15 per box of tea

Your inspiration for the project: I had the pleasure of enjoying high tea at Fortnum & Mason in Piccadilly Circus in April 2015.  It was a lovely experience and the quality and refinement of the atmosphere, tea, and food really stuck with me.  I wanted to create a brand of teas in the United States which evoked a similar feeling – one of quality, timelessness, and grace.  My aim was for the brand to be higher brow and fancier than Lipton and Twinnings (which are more generic and pedestrian) or Tazo and Teavanna (which are more down to earth and modern).
Anything interesting that came up in the design/revision process: I learned the hard way that silk screen printing really doesn’t work well on ceramic.  I attempted to brand a ceramic teapot, teacup, and saucer by using a custom silk screen that I created with the Sterling & Baxter logo, but unfortunately the slick nature of a ceramic surface and concave shape of the objects made it impossible to apply the logo without smudging or warping.

Great work, Caitlin!

Doug Aitken’s Art in Context with Roni Feinstein

This fall we are pleased to announce a new course with instructor Roni Feinstein.

Doug Aitken’s Art in Context

This class takes as its point of focus Doug Aitken: Electric Earth, an exhibition that offers the opportunity to review work of the past twenty years by this groundbreaking Los Angeles-based artist.   Aitken is best known for his pioneering work in video art, which not only rethinks the parameters of video in terms of the architectural spaces it might inhabit, but also with regard to narrative and content.   Any number of other artists, among them Bill Viola, Diana Thater, Pipilloti Rist and Ragnar Gunnarsson, also work with multi-screen video projections and Aitken’s work will be considered in relation theirs.  Aitken’s artistic practice also includes photo-based work, sculpture, collage, Earthworks, multi-media performance, participation pieces and more and these too will be related to work by his contemporaries.   It will be seen that while parallels maybe drawn between Aitken’s art and that of others, there is much that is unique and that sets his work apart.  Defining these qualities will be among the class’s aim as the exhibition is explored in depth.

Thursday, October 27, 11am – 1pm: classroom lecture

Thursday November 3 and 10, 11am – 1pm: tour Doug Aitken: Electric Earth at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

To enroll, you may use this link: https://www.uclaextension.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=42735610 Or call our registration office directly at (310) 825-9971.

Instructor, Roni Feinstein, Ph.D., wrote a blog post on Doug Aitken’s retrospective, which can be accessed at the following link: http://www.ronifeinstein.com/1736/doug-aitken-electric-earth-at-the-geffen/

doug-aitken-jpeg

Installation view of Doug Aitken, Black Mirror, 2011, at Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, July 9 – September 27,  2015, photo by Norbert Migule

 

Meet new DCA Instructor Tzeitel Sorrosa

tsorrosaHere at UCLA Extension, we’re proud to welcome instructors from a wide range of professional and cultural backgrounds. Tzeitel Sorrosa is a multicultural creative director who brings her diverse experience to our Illustrator II online course beginning in winter quarter. Born in Costa Rica, Tzeitel was raised in Ecuador and received her education at Boston College.

She says, “My most valuable training, however, has come through my extensive travel, diverse areas of studies, and consistent curiosity to explore beyond the world around me.”

Below she shares how her artistic intuition has shaped her work, as well as some info on what you can expect in her upcoming course.

What brought you to this field?

During my childhood, I frequently expressed my thoughts, feelings, and wild ideas through doodles and sketches almost always with graphite or charcoal, and Stonehenge paper. In unstoppable mode, I graffiti-ed everywhere in school, including my text books, wooden desks and freshly-painted walls (to the chagrin of my teachers). Doodling has been an excellent channel of communication for me because it has given me much room for imagination to continue to explore freely across multi-surfaces and formats. I knew at a very young age I would be a fine artist, but I did not know I would evolve into a digital artist. Technology forced me to evolve. Mobile devices have become vehicles of unlimited potential for self-expression and imagination. These devices are all fueled with unlimited energy awaiting to be channeled through YOU to create surprisingly memorable and beautiful things.

 

Tell us about an especially rewarding project you’ve worked on and why you enjoyed it so much.

I creative directed and designed the American Diabetes Association’s Welcome Kit for newly diagnosed children with Type 1 diabetes. The concept for the packaging initially started out as a very complex hexagon resembling a sugar molecule, made up of tangram shapes that kids would unfold as colorful puzzle pieces. As much as this design was engaging and playful, the costs to produce it were prohibitive. In the many rounds of feedback from our stakeholders, the iterative process took us back to a simpler but more intuitive model. Yet, the final product was one that still embraced the three key emotions I wanted to convey in the initial welcome kit design: Courage. Wisdom. Hope.

The project felt very special from the start, but it was also a journey of discovery. In design, one of the most important steps to consider is the iterative process. As designers, we’re usually biased in favor of our very first idea, and we say “Eureka!” even before we build a prototype. Prototyping, however, is not just a way to test an idea, but is also a doorway to a more meaningful conversation about the needs of your users.

 tz2

Why is your course, Illustrator II, important for my design education?

Teaching creative applications, such as Adobe Illustrator, is a doorway to constant learning. For the always-thirsty, curious mind, it creates not only a 2-way channel of giving and receiving, but an opportunity for collaboration and personal growth. There is always something new to learn from anyone and everyone, and you will be the beneficiary of a storehouse of perspectives, ideas, experiences, and information that you can later resource to in your next project.

Do you have a sample assignment?

In one of our assignments, we will be recreating IBM’s logo into 3D type miniature office buildings utilizing Illustrator’s powerful isometric tools.

Welcome, Tzeitel!

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